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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [angle]

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angle

AN'GLE, n. [L. angulus, a corner. Gr.]

In popular language, the point where two lines meet, or the meeting of two lines in a point; a corner.

In geometry, the space comprised between two straight lines that meet in a point, or between two straight converging lines which, if extended, would meet; or the quantity by which two straight lines, departing from a point, diverge from each other. The point of meeting is the vertex of the angle, and the lines, containing the angle, are its sides or legs.

In optics, the angle of incidence is the angle which a ray of light makes with a perpendicular to the surface, or to that point of the surface on which it falls.

The angle of refraction is the angle which a ray of light refracted makes with the surface of the refracting medium; or rather with a perpendicular to that point of the surface on which it falls.

A right angle, is one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90 degrees, making the quarter of a circle.

An obtuse angle is greater than a right angle, or more than 90 degrees.

A rectilineal or right-lined angle, is formed by two right lines.

A curvilineal angle, is formed by two curved lines.

A mixed angle is formed by a right line with a curved line.

Adjacent or contiguous angles are such as have one leg common to both angles, and both together are equal to two right angles.

External angles are angles of any right-lined figure without it, when the sides are produced or lengthened.

Internal angles are those which are within any right-lined figure.

Oblique angles are either acute or obtuse, in opposition to right angles.

A solid angle is the meeting of three or more plain angles at one point.

A spherical angle is one made by the meeting of two arches of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of the globe or sphere.

AN'GLE, n. A hook; an instrument to take fish, consisting of a rod, a line and a hook, or a line and hook.

AN'GLE, v.i.

1. To fish with an angle, or with line and hook.

2. v.t. or i. To fish for; to try to gain by some bait or insinuation, as men angle for fish; as, to angle for the hearts of people, or to angle hearts.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [angle]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

AN'GLE, n. [L. angulus, a corner. Gr.]

In popular language, the point where two lines meet, or the meeting of two lines in a point; a corner.

In geometry, the space comprised between two straight lines that meet in a point, or between two straight converging lines which, if extended, would meet; or the quantity by which two straight lines, departing from a point, diverge from each other. The point of meeting is the vertex of the angle, and the lines, containing the angle, are its sides or legs.

In optics, the angle of incidence is the angle which a ray of light makes with a perpendicular to the surface, or to that point of the surface on which it falls.

The angle of refraction is the angle which a ray of light refracted makes with the surface of the refracting medium; or rather with a perpendicular to that point of the surface on which it falls.

A right angle, is one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90 degrees, making the quarter of a circle.

An obtuse angle is greater than a right angle, or more than 90 degrees.

A rectilineal or right-lined angle, is formed by two right lines.

A curvilineal angle, is formed by two curved lines.

A mixed angle is formed by a right line with a curved line.

Adjacent or contiguous angles are such as have one leg common to both angles, and both together are equal to two right angles.

External angles are angles of any right-lined figure without it, when the sides are produced or lengthened.

Internal angles are those which are within any right-lined figure.

Oblique angles are either acute or obtuse, in opposition to right angles.

A solid angle is the meeting of three or more plain angles at one point.

A spherical angle is one made by the meeting of two arches of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of the globe or sphere.

AN'GLE, n. A hook; an instrument to take fish, consisting of a rod, a line and a hook, or a line and hook.

AN'GLE, v.i.

1. To fish with an angle, or with line and hook.

2. v.t. or i. To fish for; to try to gain by some bait or insinuation, as men angle for fish; as, to angle for the hearts of people, or to angle hearts.

AN'GLE, n.

A hook; an instrument to take fish, consisting of a rod, a line and a hook, or a line and hook.


AN'GLE, n. [Fr. angle; L. angulus, a corner; Gr. αγκυλος, W. ongle; G. and D. angel, a hook, an angle; Dan. angel, a hook, angle, a sting; Sax. angel, a hook; Sp. and Port. angulo; It. angolo. The German has angeln, for angling to with a hook; but in D. hengel is the rod, and hengelen, to angle. Qu. hinge and hang.]

In popular language, the point where two lines meet or the meeting of two lines in a point; a corner. In geometry, the space comprised between two straight lines that meet in a point, or between two straight converging lines which, if extended, would meet; or the quantity by which two straight lines, departing from a point, diverge from each other. The point of meeting is the vertex of the angle, and the lines, containing the angle, are its sides or legs. In optics, the angle of incidence is the angle which a ray of light makes with a perpendicular to the surface, or to that point of the surface on which it falls. The angle of refraction is the angle which a ray of light refracted makes with the surface of the refracting medium; or rather with a perpendicular to that point of the surface on which it falls. – Encyc. A right angle is one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90 degrees, making the quarter of a circle. An obtuse angle is greater than a right angle, or more than 90 degrees. An acute angle is less than a right angle, or less than 90 degrees. A rectilineal or right-lined angle is formed by two right lines. A curvilineal angle is formed by two curved lines. A mixed angle is formed by a right line with a curved line. Adjacent or contiguous angles are such as have one leg common to both angles, and both together are equal to two right angles. External angles are angles of any right-lined figure without it, when the sides are produced or lengthened. Internal angles are those which are within any right-lined figure. Oblique angles are either acute or obtuse, in opposition to right angles. A solid angle is the meeting of three or more plane angles at one point. A spherical angle is one made by the meeting of two arches of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of the globe or sphere. – Bailey.


AN'GLE, v.i.

  1. To fish with an angle, or with line and hook.
  2. v. t. or vi. To fish for; to try to gain by some bait or insinuation, as men angle for fish; as, to angle for the hearts of; people, or to angle hearts. – Shak. Sidney.

An"gle
  1. The inclosed space near the point where two lines meet; a corner; a nook.

    Into the utmost angle of the world.
    Spenser.

    To search the tenderest angles of the heart.
    Milton.

  2. To fish with an angle (fishhook), or with hook and line.
  3. To try to gain by some insinuating artifice; to allure.

    [Obs.] "He angled the people's hearts." Sir P. Sidney.
  4. The figure made by. two lines which meet.

    (b)
  5. To use some bait or artifice; to intrigue; to scheme; as, to angle for praise.

    The hearts of all that he did angle for.
    Shak.

  6. A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment.

    Though but an angle reached him of the stone.
    Dryden.

  7. A name given to four of the twelve astrological "houses."

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  8. A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod.

    Give me mine angle: we 'll to the river there.
    Shak.

    A fisher next his trembling angle bears.
    Pope.

    Acute angle, one less than a right angle, or less than 90°. -- Adjacent or Contiguous angles, such as have one leg common to both angles. -- Alternate angles. See Alternate. -- Angle bar. (a) (Carp.) An upright bar at the angle where two faces of a polygonal or bay window meet. Knight. (b) (Mach.) Same as Angle iron. -- Angle bead (Arch.), a bead worked on or fixed to the angle of any architectural work, esp. for protecting an angle of a wall. -- Angle brace, Angle tie (Carp.), a brace across an interior angle of a wooden frame, forming the hypothenuse and securing the two side pieces together. Knight. -- Angle iron (Mach.), a rolled bar or plate of iron having one or more angles, used for forming the corners, or connecting or sustaining the sides of an iron structure to which it is riveted. -- Angle leaf (Arch.), a detail in the form of a leaf, more or less conventionalized, used to decorate and sometimes to strengthen an angle. -- Angle meter, an instrument for measuring angles, esp. for ascertaining the dip of strata. -- Angle shaft (Arch.), an enriched angle bead, often having a capital or base, or both. -- Curvilineal angle, one formed by two curved lines. -- External angles, angles formed by the sides of any right-lined figure, when the sides are produced or lengthened. -- Facial angle. See under Facial. -- Internal angles, those which are within any right- lined figure. -- Mixtilineal angle, one formed by a right line with a curved line. -- Oblique angle, one acute or obtuse, in opposition to a right angle. -- Obtuse angle, one greater than a right angle, or more than 90°. -- Optic angle. See under Optic. -- Rectilineal or Right-lined angle, one formed by two right lines. -- Right angle, one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90° (measured by a quarter circle). -- Solid angle, the figure formed by the meeting of three or more plane angles at one point. -- Spherical angle, one made by the meeting of two arcs of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of a globe or sphere. -- Visual angle, the angle formed by two rays of light, or two straight lines drawn from the extreme points of an object to the center of the eye. -- For Angles of commutation, draught, incidence, reflection, refraction, position, repose, fraction, see Commutation, Draught, Incidence, Reflection, Refraction, etc.

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Angle

AN'GLE, noun [Latin angulus, a corner. Gr.]

In popular language, the point where two lines meet, or the meeting of two lines in a point; a corner.

In geometry, the space comprised between two straight lines that meet in a point, or between two straight converging lines which, if extended, would meet; or the quantity by which two straight lines, departing from a point, diverge from each other. The point of meeting is the vertex of the angle and the lines, containing the angle are its sides or legs.

In optics, the angle of incidence is the angle which a ray of light makes with a perpendicular to the surface, or to that point of the surface on which it falls.

The angle of refraction is the angle which a ray of light refracted makes with the surface of the refracting medium; or rather with a perpendicular to that point of the surface on which it falls.

A right angle is one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90 degrees, making the quarter of a circle.

An obtuse angle is greater than a right angle or more than 90 degrees.

A rectilineal or right-lined angle is formed by two right lines.

A curvilineal angle is formed by two curved lines.

A mixed angle is formed by a right line with a curved line.

Adjacent or contiguous angles are such as have one leg common to both angles, and both together are equal to two right angles.

External angles are angles of any right-lined figure without it, when the sides are produced or lengthened.

Internal angles are those which are within any right-lined figure.

Oblique angles are either acute or obtuse, in opposition to right angles.

A solid angle is the meeting of three or more plain angles at one point.

A spherical angle is one made by the meeting of two arches of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of the globe or sphere.

AN'GLE, noun A hook; an instrument to take fish, consisting of a rod, a line and a hook, or a line and hook.

AN'GLE, verb intransitive

1. To fish with an angle or with line and hook.

2. verb transitive or i. To fish for; to try to gain by some bait or insinuation, as men angle for fish; as, to angle for the hearts of people, or to angle hearts.

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Because of the wonderful influence of Christianity with Mr. Webster's definitions.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

roborant

ROB'ORANT, a. [L. roborans, roboro.] Strengthening.

ROB'ORANT, n. A medicine that strengthens; but corroborant is generally used.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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