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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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account

ACCOUNT', n.

1. A sum stated on paper; a registry of a debt or credit; of debts and credits, or charges; an entry in a book or on paper of things bought or sold, of payments, services &c., including the names of the parties to the transaction, date, and price or value of the thing.

Account signifies a single entry or charge, or a statement of a number of particular debts and credits, in a book or on a separate paper; and in the plural, is used for the books containing such entries.

2. A computation of debts and credits, or a general statement of particular sums; as, the account stands thus; let him exhibit his account.

3. A computation or mode of reckoning; applied to other things, than money or trade; as the Julian account of time.

4. Narrative; relation; statement of facts; recital of particular transactions and events, verbal or written; as an account of the revolution in France. Hence,

5. An assignment of reasons; explanation by a recital of particular transactions, given by a person in an employment, or to a superior, often implying responsibility.

Give an account of thy stewardship. Luke, 16.

Without responsibility or obligation.

He giveth not account of his matters. Job, 33.

6. Reason or consideration, as a motive; as on all accounts, on every account.

7. Value; importance; estimation; that is, such a state of persons or things, as renders them worthy of more or less estimation; as men of account of him. Ps. 144.

8. Profit; advantage; that is, a result or production worthy of estimation. To find our account in a pursuit; to turn to account.

9. Regard; behalf; sake; a sense deduced from charges on book; as on account of public affairs.

Put that to mine account. Philem. 18.

To make account, that is, to have a pervious opinion or expectation, is a sense now obsolete.

A writ of account, in law, is a writ which the plaintiff brings demanding that the defendant should render his just account, or show good cause to the contrary; call also an action of account.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [account]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

ACCOUNT', n.

1. A sum stated on paper; a registry of a debt or credit; of debts and credits, or charges; an entry in a book or on paper of things bought or sold, of payments, services &c., including the names of the parties to the transaction, date, and price or value of the thing.

Account signifies a single entry or charge, or a statement of a number of particular debts and credits, in a book or on a separate paper; and in the plural, is used for the books containing such entries.

2. A computation of debts and credits, or a general statement of particular sums; as, the account stands thus; let him exhibit his account.

3. A computation or mode of reckoning; applied to other things, than money or trade; as the Julian account of time.

4. Narrative; relation; statement of facts; recital of particular transactions and events, verbal or written; as an account of the revolution in France. Hence,

5. An assignment of reasons; explanation by a recital of particular transactions, given by a person in an employment, or to a superior, often implying responsibility.

Give an account of thy stewardship. Luke, 16.

Without responsibility or obligation.

He giveth not account of his matters. Job, 33.

6. Reason or consideration, as a motive; as on all accounts, on every account.

7. Value; importance; estimation; that is, such a state of persons or things, as renders them worthy of more or less estimation; as men of account of him. Ps. 144.

8. Profit; advantage; that is, a result or production worthy of estimation. To find our account in a pursuit; to turn to account.

9. Regard; behalf; sake; a sense deduced from charges on book; as on account of public affairs.

Put that to mine account. Philem. 18.

To make account, that is, to have a pervious opinion or expectation, is a sense now obsolete.

A writ of account, in law, is a writ which the plaintiff brings demanding that the defendant should render his just account, or show good cause to the contrary; call also an action of account.

AC-COUNT', v.t.

  1. To deem, judge, consider, think, or hold in opinion. I and my son Solomon shall be accounted offenders. – 1 Kings i.
  2. To account of, to hold in esteem; to value. Let a man so account of us as of ministers of Christ. – 1 Cor. iv. Silver was not any thing accounted of in the days of Solomon. – 1 Kings, x.
  3. To reckon, or compute; as, the motion of the sun whereby years are accounted – also to assign as a debt; as, a project accounted to his service: but these uses are antiquated.

AC-COUNT', n. [Fr. conte; It. conto; Sp. cuenta; Arm. count; an account, reckoning, computation. Formerly writers used accompt from the Fr. compte. See Count.]

  1. A sum stated on paper; a registry of a debt or credit; of debts and credits, or charges; an entry in a book or on paper of things bought or sold, of payments, services, &c., including the names of the parties to the transaction, date, and price or value of the thing. Account signifies a single entry, or charge, or a statement of a number of particular debts and credits, in a book or on a separate paper; and in the plural, is used for the books containing such entries.
  2. A computation of debts and credits, or a general statement of particular sums; as, the account stands thus; let him exhibit his account.
  3. A computation or mode of reckoning; applied to other things, than money or trade; as the Julian account of time.
  4. Narrative; relation; statement of facts; recital of particular transactions and events, verbal or written; as an account of the revolution in France. Hence,
  5. An assignment of reasons; explanation by a recital of particular transactions, given by a person in an employment, or to a superior, often implying responsibility. Give an account of thy stewardship. – Luke xvi. Without responsibility or obligation. He giveth not account of his matters. – Job xxxiii.
  6. Reason or consideration, as a motive; as, on all accounts, on every account.
  7. Value; importance; estimation; that is, such a state of persons or things, as renders them worthy of more or less estimation; as, men of account. What is the son of man that thou makest account of him. – Ps. cxliv.
  8. Profit; advantage; that is, a result or production worthy of estimation. To find our account in a pursuit; to turn to account. – Philip. iv.
  9. Regard; behalf; sake; a sense deduced from charges on book; as, on account of public affairs. Put that to my account. – Philem. 18. To make account, that is, to have a previous opinion or expectation, is a sense now obsolete. A writ of account, in law, is a writ which the plaintif brings demanding that the defendant should render his just account, or show good cause to the contrary; called also an action of account. – Cowel.

AC-COUNT', v.i.

  1. To render an account or relation of particulars. An officer must account with or to the treasurer for money received.
  2. To give reasons; to assign the causes; to explain; with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty.
  3. To render reasons; to answer for in a responsible character; as, we must account for all the talents intrusted to us.

Ac*count"
  1. A reckoning; computation; calculation; enumeration; a record of some reckoning; as, the Julian account of time.

    A beggarly account of empty boxes.
    Shak.

  2. To reckon; to compute; to count.

    [Obs.]

    The motion of . . . the sun whereby years are accounted.
    Sir T. Browne.

  3. To render or receive an account or relation of particulars; as, an officer must account with or to the treasurer for money received.
  4. A registry of pecuniary transactions; a written or printed statement of business dealings or debts and credits, and also of other things subjected to a reckoning or review; as, to keep one's account at the bank.
  5. To place to one's account; to put to the credit of; to assign; -- with to.

    [R.] Clarendon.
  6. To render an account; to answer in judgment; -- with for; as, we must account for the use of our opportunities.
  7. A statement in general of reasons, causes, grounds, etc., explanatory of some event; as, no satisfactory account has been given of these phenomena. Hence, the word is often used simply for reason, ground, consideration, motive, etc.; as, on no account, on every account, on all accounts.
  8. To value, estimate, or hold in opinion; to judge or consider; to deem.

    Accounting that God was able to raise him up.
    Heb. xi. 19.

  9. To give a satisfactory reason; to tell the cause of; to explain; -- with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty.

    To account of, to esteem; to prize; to value. Now used only in the passive. "I account of her beauty." Shak.

    Newer was preaching more accounted of than in the sixteenth century.
    Canon Robinson.

  10. A statement of facts or occurrences; recital of transactions; a relation or narrative; a report; a description; as, an account of a battle.

    "A laudable account of the city of London." Howell.
  11. To recount; to relate.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  12. A statement and explanation or vindication of one's conduct with reference to judgment thereon.

    Give an account of thy stewardship.
    Luke xvi. 2.

  13. An estimate or estimation; valuation; judgment.

    "To stand high in your account." Shak.
  14. Importance; worth; value; advantage; profit.

    "Men of account." Pope. "To turn to account." Shak.

    Account current, a running or continued account between two or more parties, or a statement of the particulars of such an account. -- In account with, in a relation requiring an account to be kept. -- On account of, for the sake of; by reason of; because of. -- On one's own account, for one's own interest or behalf. -- To make account, to have an opinion or expectation; to reckon. [Obs.]

    This other part . . . makes account to find no slender arguments for this assertion out of those very scriptures which are commonly urged against it.
    Milton.

    -- To make account of, to hold in estimation; to esteem; as, he makes small account of beauty. -- To take account of, or to take into account, to take into consideration; to notice. "Of their doings, God takes no account." Milton. -- A writ of account (Law), a writ which the plaintiff brings demanding that the defendant shall render his just account, or show good cause to the contrary; -- called also an action of account. Cowell.

    Syn. -- Narrative; narration; relation; recital; description; explanation; rehearsal. -- Account, Narrative, Narration, Recital. These words are applied to different modes of rehearsing a series of events. Account turns attention not so much to the speaker as to the fact related, and more properly applies to the report of some single event, or a group of incidents taken as whole; as, an account of a battle, of a shipwreck, etc. A narrative is a continuous story of connected incidents, such as one friend might tell to another; as, a narrative of the events of a siege, a narrative of one's life, etc. Narration is usually the same as narrative, but is sometimes used to describe the mode of relating events; as, his powers of narration are uncommonly great. Recital denotes a series of events drawn out into minute particulars, usually expressing something which peculiarly interests the feelings of the speaker; as, the recital of one's wrongs, disappointments, sufferings, etc.

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Account

ACCOUNT', noun

1. A sum stated on paper; a registry of a debt or credit; of debts and credits, or charges; an entry in a book or on paper of things bought or sold, of payments, services etc., including the names of the parties to the transaction, date, and price or value of the thing.

ACCOUNT signifies a single entry or charge, or a statement of a number of particular debts and credits, in a book or on a separate paper; and in the plural, is used for the books containing such entries.

2. A computation of debts and credits, or a general statement of particular sums; as, the account stands thus; let him exhibit his account

3. A computation or mode of reckoning; applied to other things, than money or trade; as the Julian account of time.

4. Narrative; relation; statement of facts; recital of particular transactions and events, verbal or written; as an account of the revolution in France. Hence,

5. An assignment of reasons; explanation by a recital of particular transactions, given by a person in an employment, or to a superior, often implying responsibility.

Give an account of thy stewardship. Luke 16:2.

Without responsibility or obligation.

He giveth not account of his matters. Job 33:13.

6. Reason or consideration, as a motive; as on all accounts, on every account

7. Value; importance; estimation; that is, such a state of persons or things, as renders them worthy of more or less estimation; as men of account of him. Psalms 144:3.

8. Profit; advantage; that is, a result or production worthy of estimation. To find our account in a pursuit; to turn to account

9. Regard; behalf; sake; a sense deduced from charges on book; as on account of public affairs.

Put that to mine account Phile 18.

To make account that is, to have a pervious opinion or expectation, is a sense now obsolete.

A writ of account in law, is a writ which the plaintiff brings demanding that the defendant should render his just account or show good cause to the contrary; call also an action of account

ACCOUNT', verb transitive

1. To deem, judge, consider, think, or hold in opinion.

I and my son Solomon shall be accounted offenders. 1 Kings 1:21.

2. To account of, to hold in esteem; to value.

Let a man so account of us as of ministers of Christ. 1 Corinthians 4:1.

3. To reckon, or compute; as, the motion of the sun whereby years are accounted - also to assign as a debt; as, a project accounted to his service; but these uses are antiquated.

ACCOUNT', verb intransitive

1. To render an account or relation of particulars. An officer must account with or to the Treasurer for money received.

2. To give reasons; to assign the causes; to explain; with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty.

3. To render reasons; to answer for in a responsible character.

We must account for all the talents entrusted to us.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

vexed

VEX'ED, pp. Teased; provoked; irritated; troubled; agitated; disquieted; afflicted.

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