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Monday - December 17, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [ability]

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ability

ABIL'ITY, n. [L. habilitas, ableness, fitness, from habeo, to have or hold.]

1. Physical power, whether bodily or mental; natural or acquired; force of understanding; skill in arts or science. Ability is active power, or power to perform; as opposed to capacity, or power to receive. In the plural, abilities is much used in a like sense; and also for faculties of the mind, and acquired qualifications.

2. Riches, wealth, substance, which are the means, or which furnish the power, of doing certain acts.

They gave after their ability to the work. Ez. 2.

3. Moral power, depending on the will - a metaphysical and theological sense.

4. Civil or legal power, the power or right to do certain things, as an ability to transfer property or dispose of effects - ability to inherit. It is opposed to disability.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [ability]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

ABIL'ITY, n. [L. habilitas, ableness, fitness, from habeo, to have or hold.]

1. Physical power, whether bodily or mental; natural or acquired; force of understanding; skill in arts or science. Ability is active power, or power to perform; as opposed to capacity, or power to receive. In the plural, abilities is much used in a like sense; and also for faculties of the mind, and acquired qualifications.

2. Riches, wealth, substance, which are the means, or which furnish the power, of doing certain acts.

They gave after their ability to the work. Ez. 2.

3. Moral power, depending on the will - a metaphysical and theological sense.

4. Civil or legal power, the power or right to do certain things, as an ability to transfer property or dispose of effects - ability to inherit. It is opposed to disability.

A-BIL'I-TY, n. [Fr. habileté; It. abilità; Sp. habilidad; L. habilitas, ableness, fitness, from habeo, to have or hold.]

  1. Physical power, whether bodily or mental; natural or acquired; force of understanding; skill in arts or science. Ability is active power, or power to perform; as opposed to capacity, or power to receive. In the plural, abilities is much used in a like sense; and also for faculties of the mind, and acquired qualifications. – Franklin.
  2. Riches, wealth, substance, which are the means, or which furnish the power, of doing certain acts. They gave according to their ability to the work. – Ezra ii.
  3. Moral power, depending on the will – a metaphysical and theological sense.
  4. Civil or legal power; the power or right to do certain things; as, an ability to transfer property or dispose of effects – ability to inherit. It is opposed to disability. – Cyc.

A*bil"i*ty
  1. The quality or state of being able; power to perform, whether physical, moral, intellectual, conventional, or legal; capacity; skill or competence in doing; sufficiency of strength, skill, resources, etc.; -- in the plural, faculty, talent.

    Then the disciples, every man according to his ability, determined to send relief unto the brethren.
    Acts xi. 29.

    Natural abilities are like natural plants, that need pruning by study.
    Bacon.

    The public men of England, with much of a peculiar kind of ability.
    Macaulay.

    Syn. -- Capacity; talent; cleverness; faculty; capability; efficiency; aptitude; aptness; address; dexterity; skill. Ability, Capacity. These words come into comparison when applied to the higher intellectual powers. Ability has reference to the active exercise of our faculties. It implies not only native vigor of mind, but that ease and promptitude of execution which arise from mental training. Thus, we speak of the ability with which a book is written, an argument maintained, a negotiation carried on, etc. It always something to be done, and the power of doing it. Capacity has reference to the receptive powers. In its higher exercises it supposes great quickness of apprehension and breadth of intellect, with an uncommon aptitude for acquiring and retaining knowledge. Hence it carries with it the idea of resources and undeveloped power. Thus we speak of the extraordinary capacity of such men as Lord Bacon, Blaise Pascal, and Edmund Burke. "Capacity," says H. Taylor, "is requisite to devise, and ability to execute, a great enterprise." The word abilities, in the plural, embraces both these qualities, and denotes high mental endowments.

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Ability

ABIL'ITY, noun [Latin habilitas, ableness, fitness, from habeo, to have or hold.]

1. Physical power, whether bodily or mental; natural or acquired; force of understanding; skill in arts or science. ability is active power, or power to perform; as opposed to capacity, or power to receive. In the plural, abilities is much used in a like sense; and also for faculties of the mind, and acquired qualifications.

2. Riches, wealth, substance, which are the means, or which furnish the power, of doing certain acts.

They gave after their ability to the work. Ezra 2:69.

3. Moral power, depending on the will - a metaphysical and theological sense.

4. Civil or legal power, the power or right to do certain things, as an ability to transfer property or dispose of effects - ability to inherit. It is opposed to disability.

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Biblical studies

— Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

redeem

REDEE'M, v.t. [L. redimo; red, re, and emo, to obtain or purchase.]

1. To purchase back; to ransom; to liberate or rescue from captivity or bondage, or from any obligation or liability to suffer or to be forfeited, by paying an equivalent; as, to redeem prisoners or captured goods; to redeem a pledge.

2. To repurchase what has been sold; to regain possession of a thing alienated, by repaying the value of it to the possessor.

If a man [shall] sell a dwelling house in a walled city, then he may redeem it within a whole year after it is sold.

Lev. 25.

3. To rescue; to recover; to deliver from.

Th' Almighty from the grave hath me redeem'd.

Redeem Israel, O God, out of all his troubles. Ps. 25. Deut. 7.

The mass of earth not yet redeemed from chaos.

4. To compensate; to make amends for.

It is a chance which does redeem all sorrows.

By lesser ills the greater to redeem.

5. To free by making atonement.

Thou hast one daughter who redeems nature from the general curse.

6. To pay the penalty of.

Which of you will be mortal to redeem man's mortal crime?

7. To save.

He could not have redeemed a portion of his time for contemplating the powers of nature.

8. To perform what has been promised; to make good by performance. He has redeemed his pledge or promise.

9. In law, to recall an estate, or to obtain the right to re-enter upon a mortgaged estate by paying to the mortgagee his principal, interest, and expenses or costs.

10. In theology, to rescue and deliver from the bondage of sin and the penalties of God's violated law, by obedience and suffering in the place of the sinner, or by doing and suffering that which is accepted in lieu of the sinner's obedience.

Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us. Gal. 3. Titus 2.

11. In commerce, to purchase or pay the value in specie, of any promissory note, bill or other evidence of debt, given by the state, by a company or corporation, or by an individual. The credit of a state, a banking company or individuals, is good when they can redeem all their stock, notes or bills, at par.

To redeem time, is to use more diligence in the improvement of it; to be diligent and active in duty and preparation. Eph. 5.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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