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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comSEARCHING -word- for [train]

Your search query [ train ] returned 55 results.
ID Word Definition

1706

all-constraining
[.] ALL-CONSTRA'INING, a. Constraining all

12206

constrain
[.] CONSTRAIN, v.t. [L., to strain, to bind. See Strain.] In a general sense, to strain; to press; to urge; to drive; to exert force, physical or moral, either in urging to action or in restraining it. Hence, [.] 1. To compel or force; to urge with irresistible power, ...

12207

constrainable
[.] CONSTRAINABLE, a. That may be constrained, forced, or repressed; liable to constraint, or to restraint.

12208

constrained
[.] CONSTRAINED, pp. Urged irresistibly or powerfully; compelled; forced; restrained; confined; bound; imprisoned; necessitated.

12209

constrainedly
[.] CONSTRAINEDLY, adv. By constraint; by compulsion.

12210

constrainer
[.] CONSTRAINER, n. One who constrains.

12211

constraining
[.] CONSTRAINING, ppr. Urging with irresistible or powerful force; compelling; forcing; repressing; confining; holding by force; pressing; binding.

12212

constraint
[.] CONSTRAINT, n. Irresistible force, or its effect; any force, or power, physical or moral, which compels to act or to forbear action, or which urges so strongly as to produce its effect upon the body or mind; compulsion; restraint; confinement. [.] [.] Not by constraint, ...

12213

constraintive
[.] CONSTRAINTIVE, a. Having power to compel.

12417

contraindicant
[.] CONTRAINDICANT, n. A symptom that forbids to treat a disorder in the usual way.

12418

contraindicate
[.] CONTRAINDICATE, v.t. [contra and indicate.] In medicine, to indicate some method of cure, contrary to that which the general tenor of the disease requires; or to forbid that to be done which the main scope of the malady points out.

12419

contraindication
[.] CONTRAINDICATION, n. An indication, from some peculiar symptom or fact, that forbids the method of cure which the main symptoms or nature of the disease requires.

17179

distrain
[.] DISTRAIN, v.t. [L. Dis and stringo. See Strain. Blackstone writes distrein.] [.] 1. To seize for debt; to take a personal chatel from the possession of a wrong-doer into the possession of the injured party, to satisfy a demand, or compel the performance of a duty; ...

17180

distrainable
[.] DISTRAINABLE, a. That is liable to be taken for distress.

17181

distrained
[.] DISTRAINED, pp. Seized for debt or to compel the performance of duty.

17182

distraining
[.] DISTRAINING, ppr. Seizing for debt, or for neglect of suit and service.

17183

distrainor
[.] DISTRAINOR, n. He who seizes goods for debt or service.

25712

half-strained
[.] H`ALF-STRAINED, a. Half-bred; imperfect.

35639

mistrain
[.] MISTRA'IN, v.t. To train or educate amiss.

38979

overstrain
[.] OVERSTRA'IN, v.i. To strain to excess; to make too violent efforts. [.] OVERSTRA'IN, v.t. To stretch too far.

44156

quatrain
[.] QUAT'RAIN, n. [L. quatror, four.] [.] A stanza of four lines rhyming alternately.

46528

restrain
[.] RESTRA'IN, v.t. [L. restringo; re and stringo, to strain. The letter g appears from the participle to be casual; stringo, for strigo. Hence strictus, strict, stricture. If the two letters st are removed, the word rigo coincides exactly, in primary sense, with L. ...

46529

restrainable
[.] RESTRA'INABLE, a. Capable of being restrained.

46530

restrained
[.] RESTRA'INED, pp. Held back from advancing or wandering; withheld; repressed; suppressed; abridged; confined.

46531

restrainedly
[.] RESTRA'INEDLY, adv. With restraint; with limitation.

46532

restrainer
[.] RESTRA'INER, n. He or that which restrains.

46533

restraining
[.] RESTRA'INING, ppr. [.] 1. Holding back from proceeding; checking; repressing; hindering from motion or action; suppressing. [.] 2. a. Abridging; limiting; as a restraining statute.

46534

restraint
[.] RESTRA'INT, n. [.] 1. The act or operation of holding back or hindering from motion, in any manner; hinderance of the will, or of any action, physical, moral or mental. [.] 2. Abridgment of liberty; as the restraint of a man by imprisonment or by duress. [.] 3. ...

49081

self-restrained
[.] SELF-RESTRA'INED, a. [self an restrain.] Restrained by itself, or by one's own power or will; not controlled by external force or authority.

49082

self-restraining
[.] SELF-RESTRA'INING, a. Restraining or controlling itself.

52560

strain
[.] STRAIN, v.t. [L. This word retains its original signification, to stretch.] [.] 1. To stretch; to draw with force; to extend with great effort; as, to strain a rope; to strain the shrouds of a ship; to strain the chords of an instrument. [.] 2. To cause to draw ...

52561

strainable
[.] STRAINABLE, a. Capable of being strained [Not in use.]

52562

strained
[.] STRAINED, pp. Stretched; violently exerted; filtered.

52563

strainer
[.] STRAINER, n. That through which any liquid passes for purification; an instrument for filtration. [.] [.] The lacteals of animal bodies are the strainers to separate the pure emulsion from its feces. [This doctrine is now questioned.]

52564

straining
[.] STRAINING, ppr. Stretching; exerting with violence; making great efforts; filtering. [.] STRAINING, n. The act of stretching; the act of filtering; filtration.

52565

straint
[.] STRAINT, n. A violent stretching or tension. [Not in use.]

53536

superstrain
[.] SUPERSTRA'IN, v.t. [super and strain.] To overstrain or stretch. [Little used.]

55954

train
[.] TRAIN, v.t. [L. traho, to draw?] [.] 1. To draw along. [.] [.] In hollow cube he train'd [.] [.] His devilish enginery. [.] 2. Top draw; to entice; to allure. [.] [.] If but twelve French [.] [.] Were there in arms, they would be as a call [.] [.] ...

55955

train-band
[.] TRA'IN-BAND, n. [train and band.] A band or company of militia. Train-bands, in the plural,militia; so called because trained to military exercises.

55956

train-bearer
[.] TRA'IN-BEARER, n. [train and bearer.] One who holds up a train.

55957

train-oil
[.] TRA'IN-OIL, n. [train and oil.] The oil procured from the blubber or fat of whales by boiling.

55958

train-road
[.] TRA'IN-ROAD, n. [train and road.] In mines, a slight rail-way for small wagons.

55959

trainable
[.] TRA'INABLE, a. That may be trained. [Little used.]

55960

trained
[.] TRA'INED, pp. Drawn; allured; educated; formed by instruction.

55961

training
[.] TRA'INING, ppr. Drawing; alluring; educating; teaching and forming by practice. [.] TRA'INING, n. The act or process of drawing or educating; education. In gardening, the operation or art of forming young trees to a wall or espalier, or of causing them to grow ...

55962

trainy
[.] TRA'INY, a. Belonging to train-oil. [Not in use.]

57731

unconstrained
[.] UNCONSTRA'INED, a. [.] 1. Free from constraint; acting voluntarily; voluntary. [.] 2. Not proceeding from constraint; as actions.

57732

unconstrainedly
[.] UNCONSTRA'INEDLY, adv. Without force or constraint; freely; spontaneously; voluntarily.

57733

unconstraint
[.] UNCONSTRA'INT, n. Freedom from constraint; ease.

59409

unrestrainable
[.] UNRESTRA'INABLE, a. That cannot be restrained.

59410

unrestrained
[.] UNRESTRA'INED, a. [.] 1. Not restrained; not controlled; not confined; not hindered. [.] 2. Licentious; loose. [.] 3. Not limited; as an unrestrained power; unrestrained truth.

59411

unrestraint
[.] UNRESTRA'INT, n. Freedom from restraint.

59725

unstrained
[.] UNSTRA'INED, a. [.] 1. Not strained; as unstrained oil. [.] 2. Easy; not forced; natural; as an unstrained derivation.

59878

untrained
[.] UNTRA'INED, a. [.] 1. Not trained; not disciplined; not skillful. [.] 2. Not educated; not instructed. [.] My wit untrained. [.] 3. Irregular; ungovernable; as untrained hope.

60113

uptrain
[.] UPTRA'IN, v.t. [up and train.] To train up; to educate. [Not in use.]

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i have become suspicious that the modern versions have been corrupted

— Kerry

Word of the Day

it

IT, pron. [L. id.]

1. A substitute or pronoun of the neuter gender, sometimes called demonstrative, and standing for any thing except males and females, "Keep thy heart with all diligence,for out of it are the issues of life." Prov. 9. Here it is the substitute for heart.

2. It is much used as the nominative case or word to verbs called impersonal; as it rains; it snows. In this case,there is no determinate thing to which it can be referred.

In other cases, it may be referred to matter, affair, or some other word. Is it come to this?

3. Very often, it is used to introduce a sentence, preceding a verb as a nominative, but referring to a clause or distinct member of the sentence. "It is well ascertained, that the figure of the earth is an oblate spheroid." What is well ascertained?

The answer will show: the figure of the earth is an oblate spheroid; it [that] is well ascertained. Here it represents the clause of the sentence,"the figure of the earth," &c. If the order of the sentence is inverted, the use of it is superseded. The figure of the earth is an oblate spheroid; that is well ascertained.

It, like that, is often a substitute for a sentence or clause of a sentence.

4. It often begins a sentence, when a personal pronoun, or the name of a person, or a masculine noun follows. It is I: be not afraid. It was Judas who betrayed Christ. When a question is asked, it follows the verb; as, who was it that betrayed Christ?

5. It is used also for the state of a person or affair.

How is it with our general?

6. It is used after intransitive verbs very indefinitely and sometimes ludicrously, but rarely in an elevated style.

If Abraham brought all with him, it is not probable he meant to walk it back for his pleasure.

The Lacedemonians, at the straits of Thermopylae, when their arms failed them, fought it out with nails and teeth.

Whether the charmer sinner it, or saint it.

Random Word

recomposed

RECOMPO'SED, pp. Quieted again after agitation; formed anew; composed a second time.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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monte

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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