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Thursday - October 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comSEARCHING -word- for [head]

Your search query [ head ] returned 123 results.
ID Word Definition

1421

ahead
[.] AHEAD, adv. Ahed', [a and head, or at head.] [.] 1. Further forward than another thing; in front; originally a sea term, denoting further forward than another ship, or on the point to which the stem is directed, in opposition to astern. [.] 2. Onward; forward; ...

3764

arrow-head
[.] AR'ROW-HEAD, n. [.] 1. The head of an arrow. [.] 2. Sagittaria; a genus of aquatic plants, so called from the resemblance of the leaves to the point of an arrow.

3937

ass-head
[.] 'ASS-HEAD, n. [ass and head.] One dull, like the ass; one slow of apprehension; a blockhead.

5020

bareheaded
[.] BA'REHEADED, [See Head.] Having the head uncovered, either from respect or other cause.

5021

bareheadedness
[.] BAREHEADEDNESS, n. State of being bareheaded.

5522

beetle-head
[.] BEE'TLE-HEAD, n. [beetle and head.] A stupid fellow.

5523

beetle-headed
[.] BEE'TLE-HEADED, a Having a head like a beetle; dull; stupid.

5596

behead
[.] BEHEAD', v.t. behed'. [be and head.] [.] To cut off the head; to sever the head from the body, with a cutting instrument; appropriately used of the execution of men for crimes.

5597

beheaded
[.] BEHEAD'ED, pp. behed'ed. Having the head cut off.

5598

beheading
[.] BEHEAD'ING, ppr. behed'ing. Severing the head from the body. [.] BEHEAD'ING,n. behed'ing. The act of separating the head from the body by a cutting instrument; decollation.

6523

blockhead
[.] BLOCK'HEAD, n. [block and head.] A stupid fellow; a dolt; a person deficient in understanding.

6524

blockheaded
[.] BLOCK'HEADED, a. Stupid; dull.

6525

blockheadly
[.] BLOCK'HEADLY, a. Like a blockhead.

6619

blunderhead
[.] BLUN'DERHEAD, n. [blunder and head.] A stupid fellow; one who blunders.

6747

bolt-head
[.] BOLT-HEAD, n. [bolt and head.] A long straight-necked glass vessel for chimical distillations, called also a matrass or receiver.

6998

bountihead
[.] BOUN'TIHEAD, n. Goodness.

7625

buffle-head
[.] BUFF'LE-HEAD, n. [buffle and head.] One who has a large head.

7626

buffle-headed
[.] BUFF'LE-HEADED, a. Having a large head, like a buffalo; dull; stupid; foolish.

7664

bulk-head
[.] BULK'-HEAD, n. [bulk and head.] A partition in a ship made with boards, to form separate apartments.

7669

bull-head
[.] BULL'-HEAD, n. [bull and head.] A genus of fishes, the Cottus, with a head broader than the body,whence the name. This fish is called by some the Miller's thumb. [.] 1. A stupid fellow; a lubber. [.] 2. A small black water vermin.

8785

cat-head
[.] CAT-HEAD, n. A strong beam projecting horizontally horizontally over a ships bows, carrying two or three sheaves, about which a rope called the cat-fall passes, and communicates with the cat-block.

8895

cats-head
[.] CATS-HEAD, n. A kind of apple.

9886

chuckle-head
[.] CHUCKLE-HEAD, n. A vulgar word in America, denoting a person with a large head, a dunce. Bailey says, a rattling, noisy, empty fellow.

10517

club-headed
[.] CLUB-HEADED, a. Having a thick head.

10730

cockshead
[.] COCKSHEAD, n. A plant, the Hedysarum or sainfoin.

12619

cool-headed
[.] COOL-HEADED, a. Having a temper not easily excited; free from passion.

17611

double-headed
[.] DOUBLE-HEADED, a. [.] 1. Having two heads. [.] 2. Having the flowers growing one to another.

17753

dragons-head
[.] DRAGONS-HEAD, n. A genus of plants, the Dracocephalum, of many species, most of them herbaceous, annual or perennial plants. [.] Dragons Head and Tail, in astronomy, are the nodes of the planets, or the two points in which the orbits of the planets intersect the ...

17824

drearihead
[.] DREARIHEAD, n. Dismalness; gloominess. [Not in use.]

17940

drowsy-headed
[.] DROWSY-HEADED, a. Heavy; having a sluggish disposition.

18058

dull-head
[.] DULL-HEAD, n. A person of dull understanding; a dolt; a blockhead.

22861

forehead
[.] FOREHEAD, n. for'hed, or rather for'ed. [.] 1. The part of the face which extends from the hair on the top of the head to the eyes. [.] 2. Impudence; confidence; assurance; audaciousness.

23002

forhead-bald
[.] FOR'HEAD-BALD, a. Bald above the forehead. Levit. 13:47.

23010

forkhead
[.] FORK'HEAD, n. the point of an arrow.

23170

fountain-head
[.] FOUNT'AIN-HEAD, n. Primary source; original; first principle.

24370

giddy-head
[.] GID'DY-HEAD, n. A person without thought or judgment.

24371

giddy-headed
[.] GID'DY-HEADED, a. Heedless; unsteady; volatile; incautious.

24404

gilthead
[.] GILT'HEAD, n. [gilt and head.] In ichthyology, a fish or a genus of fishes, the Sparus, of many species; so named from their color, or from a golden spot between the eyes. [.] 1. A bird.

24746

godhead
[.] GOD'HEAD, n. god'hed. [.] 1. Godship; deity; divinity; divine nature or essence; applied to the true God, and to heathen deities. [.] 2. A deity in person; a god or goddess.

24754

godlyhead
[.] GOD'LYHEAD, n. Goodness.

24849

goodlyhead
[.] GOOD'LYHEAD,n. Goodness, grace. [Not in use.]

25139

gray-headed
[.] GRA'Y-HEADED, a. Having a gray head or gray hair.

25323

gross-headed
[.] GROSS-HEADED, a. Having a thick skull; stupid.

25365

growthead
[.] GROWT'HEAD

25887

hardhead
[.] H`ARDHEAD, n. Clash or collision of heads in contest.

26119

head
[.] HEAD, n. hed. [.] 1. The uppermost part of the human body, or the foremost part of the body of prone and creeping animals. This part of the human body contains the organs of hearing, seeing, tasting and smelling; it contains also the brain, which is supposed to ...

26120

head-pan
[.] HEAD-PAN, n. hed'-pan. The brain-pan. [Not in use.]

26121

head-piece
[.] HEAD-PIECE, n. hed'-pece. Armor for the head; a helmet; a morion. [.] 1. Understanding; force of mind. [Not common.]

26122

head-rope
[.] HEAD-ROPE, n. hed'-rope. That part of a bolt-rope which terminates any sail on the upper edge, and to which it is sewed.

26123

head-sail
[.] HEAD-SAIL, n. hed'-sail. The head-sails of a ship are the sails which are extended on the fore-mast and bowsprit, as the foresail,foretop-sail, jib, &c.

26124

head-sea
[.] HEAD-SEA, n. hed'-sea. Waves that meet the head of a ship or roll against her course.

26125

head-wind
[.] HEAD-WIND, n. hed'-wind. A wind that blows in a direction opposite to the ship's course.

26126

head-workman
[.] HEAD-WORK'MAN, n. The chief workman of a party; a foreman in a manufactory.

26127

headach
[.] HEADACH, n. hed'ake. Pain in the head.

26128

headband
[.] HEADBAND, n. hed'band. A fillet; a band for the head; also, the band at each end of a book. Is.3.

26129

headborough
[.] HEADBOROUGH, n. hed'burro. In England, formerly, the chief of a frank-pledge, tithing or decennary, consisting of ten families; called in some counties, borsholder, that is, borough;s elder, and sometimes tithing man.

26130

headdress
[.] HEAD'DRESS, n. hed'dress. The dress of the head; the covering or ornaments of a woman's head. [.] 1. The crest, or tuft of feathers on a fowl's head.

26131

headed
[.] HEADED, pp. hed'ed. Led; directed; furnished with a head; having a top. This is used in composition, as clear-headed, long-headed, thick-headed, &c.

26132

header
[.] HEADER,n. hed'er. One who heads nails or pins. [.] 1. One who leads a mob or party. [.] 2. The first brick in the angle of a wall.

26133

headfast
[.] HEADFAST, n. hed'fast. A rope at the head of a ship to fasten it to a wharf or other object.

26134

headfirst
[.] HEADFIRST, adv. hedfurst. With the head foremost.

26135

headgargle
[.] HEADGARGLE, n. hed'gargle. A disease of cattle.

26136

headgear
[.] HEADGEAR, n. hed'gear. The dress of a woman's head.

26137

headiness
[.] HEADINESS, n. hed'iness. [See Heady.] Rashness; precipitation; a disposition to rush forward without due deliberation or prudence. [.] 1. Stubbornness; obstinacy.

26138

heading
[.] HEADING, n. hed'ing. Timber for the heads of casks.

26139

headland
[.] HEADLAND, n. hed'land. A cape; a promontory; a point of land projecting from the shore into the sea, or other expanse of water. [.] 1. A ridge or strip of unplowed land at the ends of furrows, or near a fence.

26140

headless
[.] HEADLESS, a. hed'less. Having no head; beheaded; as a headless body, neck or carcass. [.] 1. Destitute of a chief or leader. [.] 2. Destitute of understanding or prudence; rash; obstinate.

26141

headlong
[.] HEADLONG, adv. hed'long. With the head foremost; as, to fall headlong. [.] 1. Rashly; precipitately; without deliberation. [.] [.] --He hurries headlong to his fate. [.] 2. Hastily; without delay or respite. [.] HEADLONG, a. hed'long. Steep; precipitous. [.] 1. ...

26142

headman
[.] HEADMAN, n. hed'man. A chief; a leader.

26143

headmold-shot
[.] HEADMOLD-SHOT, n. A disease in children, in which the sutures of the skull, usually the coronal, ride, that is, when their edges shoot over one another, and are so close-locked as to compress the brain; often occasioning convulsions and death.

26144

headmoney
[.] HEAD'MONEY, n. hed'munny. A capitation-tax.

26145

headmost
[.] HEADMOST, a. hed'most. Most advanced; most forward; first in a line or order of progression; as the headmost ship in a fleet.

26146

headquarters
[.] HEADQUART'ERS, n. plu. The quarters or place of residence of the commander-in-chief of an army. [.] 1. The residence of any chief, or place from which orders are issued.

26147

headshake
[.] HEADSHAKE, n. hed'shake. A significant shake of the head.

26148

headship
[.] HEADSHIP, n. hed'ship. Authority; chief place.

26149

headsman
[.] HEADSMAN, n. hed'sman. One that cuts off heads; an executioner. [Unusual.]

26150

headspring
[.] HEADSPRING, n. hed'spring. Fountain; source; origin.

26151

headstall
[.] HEADSTALL, n. hed'stall. That part of a bridle which encompasses the head.

26152

headstone
[.] HEADSTONE, n. hed'stone. The principal stone in a foundation; the chief or corner stone. [.] 1. The stone at the head of a grave.

26153

headstrong
[.] HEADSTRONG, a. hed'strong. Violent; obstinate; ungovernable; resolute to run his own way; bent on pursuing his own will; not easily restrained. [.] [.] Now let the headstrong boy my will control. [.] 1. Directed by ungovernable will or proceeding from obstinacy; ...

26154

headstrongness
[.] HEAD'STRONGNESS,n. Obstinacy. [Not in use.]

26155

headtire
[.] HEADTIRE, n. hed'tire. Dress or attire for the head. 1 Esdras 3.

26156

headway
[.] HEADWAY, n. hed'way. The motion of an advancing ship. A ship makes headway, when she advances, as from a state of rest.

26157

heady
[.] HEADY, a. hed'y. [See Head.] Rash; hasty; precipitate; violent; disposed to rush forward in an enterprise without thought or deliberation; hurried on by will or passion; ungovernable. [.] [.] All the talent required,is to be heady, to be violent on one side or ...

26977

hogshead
[.] HOGS'HEAD, n. [the English orthography is grossly corrupt.] [.] 1. A measure of capacity, containing 63 gallons. [.] 2. In America,this name is often given to a butt, a cask containing from 110 to 120 gallons; as a hogshead of spirit or molasses. [.] 3. A ...

27270

horseshoe-head
[.] HORSESHOE-HEAD, n. A disease of infants, in which the sutures of the skull are too open; opposed to headmold-shot.

27326

hotheaded
[.] HOT'HEADED, a. Of ardent passions; vehement; violent; rash.

27881

idleheaded
[.] I'DLEHEADED, a. [idle and head.] Foolish; unreasonable. [.] 1. Delirious; infatuated. [Little used.]

31380

jettyhead
[.] JET'TYHEAD, n. The projecting part of a wharf; the front of a wharf whose side forms one of the cheeks of a dock.

31475

jolthead
[.] JOLTHEAD, n. A greathead; a dunce; a blockhead.

31878

knight-heads
[.] KNIGHT-HEADS, n. In ships, bollard timbers, two pieces of timber rising just within the stem, one on each side of the bowsprit to secure its inner end; also, two strong frames of timber which inclose and support the ends of the windlass.

32838

lightheaded
[.] LI'GHTHEADED, a. [See head.] [.] 1. Thoughtless; heedless; weak; volatile; unsteady. [.] 2. Disordered in the head; dizzy; delirious.

32839

lightheadedness
[.] LI'GHTHEADEDNESS, n. Disorder of the head; dizziness; deliriousness.

33225

loggerhead
[.] LOG'GERHEAD, n. [log and head.] [.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a dolt; a thick-skull. [.] 2. A spherical mass of iron, with a long handle; used to heat tar. [.] To fall to loggerheads, [.] To go to loggerheads, to come to blows; to fall to fighting without ...

33226

loggerheaded
[.] LOG'GERHEADED, a. Dull; stupid; doltish.

33265

long-headed
[.] LONG'-HEADED, a. Having a great extent of thought.

33743

madheaded
[.] MAD'HEADED, n. Hot brained; rash.

33763

maggoty-headed
[.] MAG'GOTY-HEADED, a. Having a head full of whims.

34174

many-headed
[.] MANY-HEAD'ED, a. Having many heads; as a many-headed monster; many-headed tyranny.

36303

muddy-headed
[.] MUDDY-HEADED, a. Having a dull understanding.

38854

overhead
[.] OVERHEAD, adv. overhed'. Aloft; above; in the zenith or ceiling.

40953

pigheaded
[.] PIG'HEADED, a. Having a large head; stupid.

43926

puzzle-headed
[.] PUZ'ZLE-HEADED, a. Having the head full of confused notions.

44657

rattle-headed
[.] RAT'TLE-HEADED, a. Noisy; giddy; unsteady.

44695

rawhead
[.] RAW'HEAD, n. The name of a specter, mentioned to frighten children; as rawhead and bloody bones.

47351

roundhead
[.] ROUND'HEAD, n. [round and head.] A name formerly given to a puritan, from the practice which prevailed among the puritans of cropping the hair round.

47352

roundheaded
[.] ROUND'HEADED, a. Having a round head or top.

48146

scaldhead
[.] SCALD'HEAD, n. [See Scald.] A lothesome affection of the head, in which it is covered with a continuous scab. [.]

48924

seemlyhead
[.] SEE'MLYHEAD, [See Head and Hood.] Comely or decent appearance. Obs.

49629

sheading
[.] SHE'ADING, n. In the isle of Man, a riding, tithing or division, in which there is a corner or chief constable. The isle is divided into six sheading.

49675

sheeps-head
[.] SHEE'P'S-HEAD, n. [sheep and head.] A fish caught on the shores of Connecticut and of Long Island, so called from the resemblance of its head to that of a sheep. It is esteemed delicious food.

51698

spring-head
[.] SPRING-HEAD, n. A fountain or source. [Useless.]

51920

stake-head
[.] STAKE-HEAD, n. In rope-making, a stake with wooden pins in the upper side to keep the strands apart.

55112

thickheaded
[.] THICK'HEADED, a. Having a thick skull; dull; stupid.

55446

timber-head
[.] TIM'BER-HEAD, n. [timber and head.] In ships, the top end of a timber, rising above the gunwale, and serving for belaying ropes, &c.; otherwise called kevelhead.

56836

turks-head
[.] TURK'S-HEAD, n. A plant of the genus Cactus.

58567

unhead
[.] UNHEAD, v.t. unhed'. To take out the head of; as, to unhead a cask.

58568

unheaded
[.] UNHEADED, pp. unhed'ed. Having the head taken out.

58569

unheading
[.] UNHEADING, ppr. unhed'ing. Taking out the head of.

61803

well-head
[.] WELL-HEAD, n. [well and head.] A source, spring or fountain.

62732

wronghead
[.] WRONGHEAD, WRONGHEADED, a. [wrong and head.] Wrong in opinion or principle; having a perverse understanding; perverse.

62733

wrongheaded
[.] WRONGHEAD, WRONGHEADED, a. [wrong and head.] Wrong in opinion or principle; having a perverse understanding; perverse.

62734

wrongheadedness
[.] WRONGHEADEDNESS, n. Perverseness; erroneousness.

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importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

hatchel

HATCH'EL, n. An instrument formed with long iron teeth set in a board, for cleaning flax or hemp from the tow, hards or coarse part. The hatchel is a large species of comb.

HATCH'EL, v.t. To draw flax or hemp through the teeth of a hatchel, for separating the coarse part and broken pieces of the stalk from the fine fibrous parts.

1. To tease or vex, by sarcasms or reproaches; a vulgar use of the word.

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