HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Thursday - June 22, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comSEARCHING -word- for [ere]

Your search query [ ere ] returned 769 results.
ID Word Definition

451

accoutered
[.] ACCOUT'ERED, pp. Dressed in arms; equipped.

773

adhere
[.] ADHE'RE, v.i. [L. adhaereo, ad and haereo, to stick.] [.] 1. To stick to, as glutinous substances, or by natural growth; as, the lungs sometimes adhere to the pleura. [.] 2. To be joined, or held in contact; to cleave to. [.] 3. Figuratively, to hold to, be ...

774

adherence
[.] ADHE'RENCE, n. [.] 1. The quality or state of sticking or adhering. [.] 2. Figuratively, a being fixed in attachment; fidelity; steady attachment; as, an adherence to a party or opinions.

775

adherency
[.] ADHE'RENCY, n. The same as adherence. In the sense of that which adhers, not legitimate.

776

adherent
[.] ADHE'RENT, a. Sticking, uniting, as glue or wax; united with, as an adherent mode in Locke, that is, a mode accidentally joined with an object, as wetness in a cloth. [.] ADHE'RENT, n. The person who adheres; one who follows a leader, party or profession; a follower, ...

777

adherently
[.] ADHE'RENTLY, adv. In an adherent manner.

778

adherer
[.] ADHE'RER, n. One that adheres; an adherent.

793

adipocere
[.] AD'IPOCERE, n. [L. adeps, fat, and cera.] [.] A soft unctuous or waxy substance, of a light brown color, into which the muscular fibers of dead animal bodies are converted, when protected from atmospheric air, and under certain circumstances of temperature and humidity. ...

853

administered
[.] ADMIN'ISTERED, pp. Executed; managed; governed; afforded; given; dispensed.

955

adulterer
[.] ADUL'TERER, n. [L. adulter.] [.] 1. A man guilty of adultery; a man who has sexual commerce with any married woman, except his wife. [See Adultery.] [.] 2. In scripture, an idolator. Ezek. 23. [.] 3. An apostate from the true faith, or one who violates his ...

956

adulteress
[.] ADUL'TERESS, n. A married woman guilty of incontinence.

1111

affeered
[.] AFFEE'RED, pp. Moderated in sum; assessed; reduced to a certainty.

1747

all-interesting
[.] ALL-IN'TERESTING, a. Interesting in the highest degree.

2501

angered
[.] AN'GRED or ANG'ERED, pp. Made angry; provoked.

2675

answered
[.] ANSWERED, pp. Replied to; fulfilled; paid; complied with; accomplished; solved; confuted.

2676

answerer
[.] ANSWERER, n. One who answers; he or that which makes a return to what another has spoken; he who writes an answer.

2943

antlered
[.] ANT'LERED, a. Furnished with antlers.

2993

apheresis
[.] APHERE'SIS, n. [Gr. from, and to take.] [.] 1. The taking of a litter or syllable from the beginning of a word. Thus by an apheresis, omittere is writter, mittere. [.] 2. In the healing art, the removal of any thing noxious. In surgery, amputation.

3445

archeress
[.] 'ARCHERESS, n. A female archer.

3454

archflatterer
[.] ARCHFLAT'TERER, n. [See Flatter.] A chief flatterer.

3458

archheresy
[.] ARCHHER'ESY, n. [See Heresy.] The greatest heresy.

3459

archheretic
[.] ARCHHER'ETIC, n. A chief heretic.

3460

archhierey
[.] ARCHHI'EREY, n. [Gr. chief, and priest.] A chief priest in Russia.

3744

arriere
[.] ARRIE'RE, n. The last body of an army; now called rear, which see. [.] Arriere-ban, or ban and arriere ban. This phrase is defined to be a general proclamation of the French kings, by which not only their immediate feudatories, but their vassals, were summoned to ...

4218

atmosphere
[.] AT'MOSPHERE, n. [Gr. vapor, and a sphere. [.] The whole mass of fluid, consisting of air, aqueous and other vapors, surrounding the earth.

4276

attempered
[.] ATTEM'PERED, ppr. Reduced in quality; moderated; softened; well mixed; suited.

4448

austere
[.] AUSTE'RE, a. [L. Austerus. [.] 1. Severe; harsh; rigid; stern; applied to persons; as an austere master; an austere look. [.] 2. Sour; harsh; rough to the taste; applied to things; as austere fruit, or wine.

4449

austerely
[.] AUSTE'RELY, adv. Severely; rigidly; harshly.

4450

austereness
[.] AUSTE'RENESS, n. [.] 1. Severity in manners; harshness; austerity. [.] 2. Roughness in taste.

4536

avengeress
[.] AVENG'ERESS, n. A female avenger.

4891

balustered
[.] BAL'USTERED, a. Having balusters. [.] 23

4906

banderet
[.] BAND'ERET, n. [from band.] In Swisserland, a general in chief of military forces.

4950

bannered
[.] BAN'NERED, a. Furnished with or bearing banners. [.] Shield the strong foes, and rake the bannered shore.

4951

banneret
[.] BAN'NERET, n. A knight made in the field. Bannerets formerly constituted an order of knights or feudal lords, who led their vassals to battle under their own flags. On the day of battle, the candidates presented their flags to the king or general, who cut off the ...

4966

bantered
[.] BAN'TERED, pp. Rallied; laughed at in good humor.

4967

banterer
[.] BAN'TERER, n. One who banters, or laughs at with pleasantry.

5103

bartered
[.] B'ARTERED,pp. Given in exchange.

5104

barterer
[.] B'ARTERER, n. One who trafficks by exchange of commodities.

5238

battered
[.] BAT'TERED, pp. Beaten; bruised, broken, impaired by beating or wearing.

5239

batterer
[.] BAT'TERER, n. One who batters or beats.

5388

beavered
[.] BE'AVERED, a. Covered with or wearing a beaver.

5393

beblubbered
[.] BEBLUB'BERED, a. [be and blubber.] Foul or swelled with weeping.

5645

beleaguered
[.] BELE'AGUERED, pp. Besieged.

5646

beleaguerer
[.] BELE'AGUERER, n. One who besieges.

5680

belligerent
... [.] BELLIG'ERENT, ...

5717

belvidere
[.] BEL'VIDERE,n. [L.bellus,fine and video, to see.] [.] 1. A plant, a species of chenopodium, goosefoot or wild orach, called scoparia or annual mock cypress. It is of a beautiful pyramidical form, and much esteemed in China, as a salad, and for other uses. [.] 2. ...

5818

bere
[.] BERE, n. The name of a species of barley in Scotland.

5819

bereave
[.] BERE'AVE, v.t. pret.bereaved, bereft: pp.bereaved, bereft. [.] 1. To deprive; to strip; to make destitute; with of before the thing taken away. [.] Me have ye bereaved of my children. Gen.42. [.] It is sometimes used without of, and is particularly applied to ...

5820

bereaved
[.] BERE'AVED, pp. Deprived; stripped and left destitute.

5821

bereavement
[.] BERE'AVEMENT, n. Deprivation, particularly by the loss of a friend by death.

5822

bereaving
[.] BERE'AVING, ppr. Stripping bare; depriving.

5823

bereft
[.] BEREFT', pp. of bereave. Deprived; made destitute.

5824

berengarianism
[.] BERENGA'RIANISM, n. The opinions or doctrines of Berengarius, archdeacon of St.Mary at Anjou, and of his followers, who deny the reality of the body and blood of Christ in the Eucharist.

5828

bergeret
[.] BER'GERET, n. A song. [Not used.]

5910

bespattered
[.] BESPAT'TERED, pp. Spattered over; soiled with dirt and water; aspersed; calumniated.

5931

best-tempered
[.] BEST-TEM'PERED, a. Having the most kind or mild temper.

6004

bettered
[.] BET'TERED, pp. Improved; meliorated; made better.

6031

bewildered
[.] BEWIL'DERED, pp. Lost in mazes; perplexed with disorder, confusion, or intricacy.

6042

bewondered
[.] BEWON'DERED, a. [be and wonder.] Amazed. [Not used.]

6101

bickerer
[.] BICK'ERER, n. One who bickers, or engages in a petty quarrel.

6155

biguddered
[.] BIG'UDDERED, a. [big and udder.] [.] Having large udders, or udders swelled with milk.

6367

bladdered
[.] BLAD'DERED, a. Swelled like a bladder.

6419

blatterer
[.] BLAT'TERER, n. A noisy blustering boaster. [Not used.] [.]

6502

blistered
[.] BLIS'TERED, pp. Having blisters or tumors.

6535

blood-boltered
[.] BLOOD-BOLTERED, a. [blood and bolter.] Sprinkled with blood. [Not used.]

6568

bloody-sceptered
[.] BLOODY-SCEP'TERED, a. Having a scepter obtained by blood or slaughter.

6596

blubbered
[.] BLUB'BERED, pp. Swelled; big; turgid; as a blubbered lip.

6618

blunderer
[.] BLUN'DERER, n. One who is apt to blunder, or to make gross mistakes; a careless person.

6638

blusterer
[.] BLUS'TERER, n. A swaggerer; a bully; a noisy, tumultuous fellow, who makes great pretensions from vanity.

6688

bockeret
[.] BOCK'ERET, n. A kind of long-winged hawk.

6741

bolstered
[.] BOLSTERED, a. Swelled out.

6742

bolsterer
[.] BOLSTERER, n. A supporter.

6883

bordered
[.] BORD'ERED, pp. Adorned or furnished with a border.

6884

borderer
[.] BORD'ERER, n. One who dwells on a border, or at the extreme part or confines of a country, region or tract of land; one who dwells near to a place.

7427

broad-shouldered
[.] BROAD-SHOULDERED, a. [broad and shoulder.] Broad across the shoulders.

7453

broiderer
[.] BROID'ERER, n. One that embroiders.

7956

cackerel
[.] CACKEREL, n. A fish which is said to void excrements when pursued. Others say, a fish which eaten produces lax bowels.

8286

cankered
[.] CANKERED, pp. [.] 1. Corrupted. [.] 2. a. Crabbed; uncivil.

8287

cankeredly
[.] CANKEREDLY, adv. Crossly; adversely.

8383

caperer
[.] CAPERER, n. One who capers, leaps and skips about, or dances.

8414

caponniere
[.] CAPONNIERE, n. In fortification, a covered lodgment, sunk four or five feet into the ground, encompassed with a parapet, about two feet high, serving to support several planks, laden with earth. It is large enough to contain 15 or 20 soldiers, and is placed in the ...

8703

cashiered
[.] CASHIERED, pp. Dismissed; discarded; annulled.

8704

cashierer
[.] CASHIERER, n. One who rejects discards or breaks; as a cashierer of monarchs.

8863

caterer
[.] CATERER, n. A provider, buyer or purveyor of provision.

8864

cateress
[.] CATERESS, n. A woman who caters; a female provider of food.

9099

centered
[.] CENTERED, pp. Collected to a point or center; fixed on a central point.

9144

cere
[.] CERE, n. The naked skin that covers the base of a hawks bill. [.] CERE, v.t. To wax or cover with wax.

9145

cerebel
[.] CEREBEL,

9146

cerebellum
[.] CEREBELLUM, n. The hinder part of the head, or the little brain.

9147

cerebral
[.] CEREBRAL,

9148

cerebrine
[.] CEREBRINE, a. Pertaining to the cerebrum or brain.

9149

cerecloth
[.] CERECLOTH, n. A cloth smeared with melted wax, or with some gummy or glutinous matter. [But the English word for a cloth used to cover wounds is sear-cloth.]

9150

cerement
[.] CEREMENT, n. Cloths dipped in melted wax, with which dead bodies were infolded, when embalmed.

9151

ceremonial
[.] CEREMONIAL, a. [See Ceremony.] [.] 1. Relating to ceremony, or external rite; ritual; according to the forms of established rites; as ceremonial exactness. It is particularly applied to the forms and rites of the Jewish religion; as the ceremonial law or worship, ...

9152

ceremonially
[.] CEREMONIALLY, adv. According to rites and ceremonies; as a person ceremonially unclean; an act ceremonially unlawful.

9153

ceremonious
[.] CEREMONIOUS, a. [.] 1. Consisting of outward forms and rites; as the ceremonious part of worship. [In this sense, ceremonial is now used.] [.] 2. Full of ceremony or solemn forms. [.] 3. According to the rules and forms prescribed or customary; civil; formally ...

9154

ceremoniously
[.] CEREMONIOUSLY, adv. In a ceremonious manner; formally; with due forms.

9155

ceremoniousness
[.] CEREMONIOUSNESS, n. The use of customary forms; the practice of too much ceremony; great formality in manners.

9156

ceremony
[.] CEREMONY, n. [.] 1. Outward rite; external form in religion. [.] 2. Forms of civility; rules established by custom for regulating social intercourse. [.] 3. Outward forms of state; the forms prescribed or established by order or custom, serving for the purpose ...

9157

cereolite
[.] CEREOLITE, n. A substance which in appearance and softness resembles wax; sometimes confounded with steatite.

9158

cereous
[.] CEREOUS, a. Waxen; like wax.

9159

ceres
[.] CERES, n. [.] 1. In mythology, the inventor or goddess of corn, or rather the name of corn deified. [.] 2. The name of a planet discovered by M. Piozzi, at Palermo in Sicily, in 1801.

9277

chamberer
[.] CHAMBERER,

9285

chamfered
[.] CHAMFERED, pp. Cut into furrows, or cut sloping.

9417

charmeress
[.] CHARMERESS, n. An enchantress.

9433

chartered
[.] CHARTERED, pp. [.] 1. Hired or let, as a ship. [.] 2. Invested with privileges by charter; privileged. [.] 3. Granted by charter; as chartered rights; chartered power.

9472

chatterer
[.] CHATTERER, n. A prater; an idle talker.

9511

cheered
[.] CHEERED, pp. Enlivened; animated; made glad.

9512

cheerer
[.] CHEERER, n. One who cheers; he or that which gladdens. [.] [.] Thou cheerer of our days. [.] [.] Prime cheerer, light.

9611

chideress
[.] CHIDERESS, n. A female who chides.

9986

cinereous
[.] CINEREOUS, a. Like ashes; having the color of the ashes of wood.

10038

circumference
[.] CIRCUMFERENCE, n. [.] 1. The line that bounds a circle; the exterior line of a circular body; the whole exterior surface of a round body; a periphery. [.] 2. The space included in a circle. [.] 3. An orb; a circle; any thing circular or orbicular; as in Milton, ...

10039

circumferential
[.] CIRCUMFERENTIAL, a. Pertaining to the circumference.

10040

circumferentor
[.] CIRCUMFERENTOR, n. An instrument used by surveyors for taking angles. It consists of a brass index, and circle, all of a piece; on the circle is a chart, divided into 360 degrees. There are also two sights to screw on and slide up and down the index; also a spangle ...

10235

claspered
[.] CLASPERED, a. Furnished with tendrils.

10248

clatterer
[.] CLATTERER, n. One who clatters; a babbler.

10281

clean-timbered
[.] CLEAN-TIMBERED, a. Well-proportioned.

10418

cloistered
[.] CLOISTERED, pp. [.] 1. Shut up in a cloister; inhabiting a monastery. [.] 2. a. Solitary; retired from the world. [.] 3. Built with peristyles or piazzas; inclosed.

10479

cloud-covered
[.] CLOUD-COVERED, a. Enveloped with clouds.

10503

clovered
[.] CLOVERED, a. Covered with clover.

10539

clustered
[.] CLUSTERED, pp. Collected into a cluster, or crowd; crowded.

10546

cluttered
[.] CLUTTERED, pp. Encumbered with things in disorder.

10575

co-sufferer
[.] CO-SUFFERER, n. One who suffers with another.

10677

cobelligerent
[.] COBELLIGERENT, a. [See Belligerent.] Carrying on war in conjunction with another power. [.] COBELLIGERENT, n. A nation or state that carries on war in connection with another.

10716

cockerel
[.] COCKEREL, n. A young cock.

10795

coffered
[.] COFFERED, pp. Laid up in a coffer.

10796

cofferer
[.] COFFERER, n. The Cofferer of the kings household in Great Britain, a principal officer of the court, next under the Controller. He was also a white-staff officer, and a member of the privy council. He had the special charge and oversight of the other officers of ...

10834

cohere
[.] COHERE, v.i. [.] 1. To stick together; to cleave; to be united; to hold fast, as parts of the same mass, or as two substances that attract each other. Thus, particles of clay cohere; polished surfaces of bodies cohere. [.] 2. To be well connected; to follow regularly ...

10835

coherence
[.] COHERENCE,

10836

coherency
[.] COHERENCY, n. [.] 1. A sticking, cleaving or hanging together; union of parts of the same body, or a cleaving together of two bodies, by means of attraction; applied to all substances, solid or fluid. [.] 2. Connection; suitable connection or dependence, proceeding ...

10837

coherent
[.] COHERENT, a. [.] 1. Sticking together; cleaving; as the parts of bodies, solid or fluid. [.] 2. Connected; united, by some relation in form or order; followed by to, but rather by with. [.] 3. Suitable or suited; regularly adapted. [.] 4. Consistent; having ...

10838

coherently
[.] COHERENTLY, adv. In a coherent manner; with due connection or agreement of parts.

11565

concentered
[.] CONCENTERED, pp. Brought to a common center; united in a point.

11786

conference
[.] CON'FERENCE, n. [See Confer.] [.] 1. The act of conversing on a serious subject; a discoursing between two or more, for the purpose of instruction, consultation, or deliberation; formal discourse; oral discussion. [.] [.] For they who seemed to be somewhat, in conference ...

12039

conquered
[.] CONQUERED, pp. Overcome; subdued; vanquished; gained; won.

12040

conqueress
[.] CONQUERESS, n. A female who conquers; a victorious female.

12109

considered
[.] CONSIDERED, pp. Thought of with care; pondered; viewed attentively; deliberated on; examined.

12110

considerer
[.] CONSIDERER, n. A thinker; one who considers; a man of reflection. [Considerator is not in use.]

12665

coppered
[.] COPPERED, pp. Covered with sheets of copper; sheathed.

12774

cornered
[.] CORNERED, a. Having corners; having three or more angles.

12921

corse-encumbered
[.] CORSE-ENCUMBERED, a. Loaded with dead bodies; as the corse-encumbered plains.

13229

covered
[.] COVERED, pp. Spread over; hid; concealed; clothed; vailed; having a hat on; wrapped; inclosed; sheltered; protected; disguised.

13591

crook-shouldered
[.] CROOK-SHOULDERED, a. Having bent shoulders.

14549

deciphered
[.] DECI'PHERED, pp. Explained; unraveled; marked. [.] DECI'PHERER, n. One who explains what is written in ciphers. [.] DECI'PHERING, ppr. Explaining; detecting the letters represented by ciphers; unfolding; marking. [.] DECIS'ION, ...

14550

decipherer
[.] DECI'PHERER, n. One who explains what is written in ciphers. [.] DECI'PHERING, ppr. Explaining; detecting the letters represented by ciphers; unfolding; marking. [.] DECIS'ION, n.

14775

deference
[.] DEFERENCE, n. [.] 1. A yielding in opinion; submission of judgment to the opinion or judgment of another. Hence, regard; respect. We often decline acting in opposition to those for whose wisdom we have a great deference. [.] 2. Complaisance; condescension. [.] 3. ...

14776

deferent
[.] DEFERENT, a. Bearing; carrying; conveying. [.] DEFERENT, n. [.] 1. That which carries or conveys. The deferent of a planet, is an imaginary circle or orb in the Ptolemaic system, that is supposed to carry about the body of the planet. [.] 2. A vessel in ...

14777

deferential
[.] DEFERENTIAL,, a. Expressing deference.

14998

delivered
[.] DELIVERED, pp. Freed; released; transferred or transmitted; passed from one to another; committed; yielded; surrendered; rescued; uttered; pronounced.

14999

deliverer
[.] DELIVERER, n. [.] 1. One who delivers; one who releases or rescues; a preserver. [.] [.] The Lord raised up a deliverer to Israel. Judges 30. [.] 2. One who relates, or communicates.

15384

dere
[.] DERE, v.t. To hurt.

15385

derelict
[.] DERELICT, a. [L. To leave.] Left; abandoned. [.] DERELICT, n. [.] 1. In law, an article of goods, or any commodity, thrown away, relinquished or abandoned by the owner. [.] 2. A tract of land left dry by the sea, and fit for cultivation or use.

15386

dereliction
[.] DERELICTION, n. [.] 1. The act of leaving with an intention not to reclaim; an utter forsaking; abandonment. [.] 2. The state of being left or abandoned. [.] 3. A leaving or receding from; as the dereliction of the sea.

15939

difference
[.] DIFFERENCE, n. [.] 1. The state of being unlike or distinct; distinction; disagreement; want of sameness; variation; dissimilarity. Difference may be total or partial, and exist in the nature and essence of things, in the form, the qualities or degrees. There is ...

15940

different
[.] DIFFERENT, a. [.] 1. Distinct; separate; not the same; as, we belong to different churches or nations. [.] 2. Various or contrary; of various or contrary natures, forms or qualities; unlike; dissimilar; as different kinds of food or drink; different states of health; ...

15941

differential
[.] DIFFERENTIAL, a. An epithet applied to an infinitely small quantity, so small as to be less than any assignable quantity. This is called a differential quantity. The differential method is applied to the doctrine of infinitesimals, or infinitely small quantities, called ...

15942

differently
[.] DIFFERENTLY, adv. In a different manner; variously. Men are differently affected with the same eloquence.

15974

digerent
[.] DIGERENT, a. [L.] Digesting. [Not in use.]

16267

disastered
[.] DISASTERED, pp. Blasted; injured; afflicted.

16358

discoherent
[.] DISCOHERENT, a. Incoherent. The latter is generally used.

16455

discovered
[.] DISCOVERED, pp. Uncovered; disclosed to view; laid open; revealed; espied or first seen; found out; detected.

16456

discoverer
[.] DISCOVERER, n. [.] 1. One who discovers; one who first sees or espies; one who finds out, or first comes to the knowledge of something. [.] 2. A scout; an explorer.

16553

disencumbered
[.] DISENCUMBERED, pp. Freed from incumbrance.

16695

disinteressed
[.] DISINTERESSED, DISINTERESSMENT, [See Disinterested, &c.]

16696

disinteressment
[.] DISINTERESSED, DISINTERESSMENT, [See Disinterested, &c.]

16697

disinterest
[.] DISINTEREST, n. [dis and interest.] [.] 1. What is contrary to the interest or advantage; disadvantage; injury. [Little used or not at all.] [.] 2. Indifference to profit; want of regard to private advantage. [.] DISINTEREST, v.t. To disengage from private ...

16698

disinterested
[.] DISINTERESTED, a. [.] 1. Uninterested; indifferent; free from self-interest; having no personal interest or private advantage in a question or affair. It is important that a judge should be perfectly disinterested. [.] 2. Not influenced or dictated by private advantage; ...

16699

disinterestedly
[.] DISINTERESTEDLY, adv. In a disinterested manner.

16700

disinterestedness
[.] DISINTERESTEDNESS, n. The state or quality of having no personal interest or private advantage in a question or event; freedom from bias or prejudice, on account of private interest; indifference.

16701

disinteresting
[.] DISINTERESTING, a. Uninteresting. [The latter is the word now used.]

16764

dismembered
[.] DISMEMBERED, pp. Divided member from member; torn or cut in pieces; divided by the separation of a part from the main body.

16797

disordered
[.] DISORDERED, pp. Put out of order; derranged; disturbed; discomposed; confused; sick; indisposed. [.] DISORDERED, a. Disorderly; irregular; vicious; loose; unrestrained in behavior.

16798

disorderedness
[.] DISORDEREDNESS, n. A state of disorder or irregularity; confusion.

17062

dissevered
[.] DISSEVERED, pp. Disparted; disjoined; separated.

17129

distempered
[.] DISTEMPERED, pp. or a. [.] 1. Diseased in body, or disordered in mind. We speak of a distempered body, a distempered limb, a distempered head or brain. [.] 2. Disturbed; ruffled; as distempered passions. [.] 3. Deprived of temper or moderation; immoderate; as ...

17243

ditch-delivered
[.] DITCH-DELIVERED, a. Brought forth in a ditch.

17319

divineress
[.] DIVINERESS, n. A female diviner; a woman professing divination.

17379

doddered
[.] DODDERED, a. Overgrown with dodder; covered with supercrescent plants.

17417

doggerel
[.] DOGGEREL, a. An epithet given to a kind of loose, irregular measure in burlesque poetry, like that of Hudibras; as doggerel verse or rhyme. [.] DOGGEREL, n. A loose, irregular kind of poetry; used in burlesque.

17590

dotterel
[.] DOTTEREL, n. The name of different species of fowls, of the genus Charadrius and the grallic order; as the Alexandrine dotterel, the ringed dotterel, and the Morinellus; also, the turnstone or sea dotterel, a species of the genus Tringa.

17676

dowered
[.] DOWERED, a. Furnished with dower, or a portion.

17908

drop-serene
[.] DROP-SERENE, n. A disease of the eye; amaurosis, or blindness from a diseased retina.

18072

dummerer
[.] DUMMERER, n. One who feigns dumbness. [Not in use.]

18195

eachwhere
[.] E'ACHWHERE, adv. Every where.

18217

ear-erecting
[.] EAR-ERECT'ING, a. Setting up the ears.

18724

elsewhere
[.] ELSEWHERE, adv. In any other place; as, these trees are not to be found elsewhere. [.] 1. In some other place; in other places indefinitely. It is reported in town and elsewhere.

18880

embroidered
[.] EMBROID'ERED, pp. Adorned with figures of needle-work.

18881

embroiderer
[.] EMBROID'ERER, n. One who embroiders.

18950

emperess
[.] EM'PERESS. [See Empress.]

18988

empowered
[.] EMPOW'ERED, pp. Authorized; having legal or moral right.

19086

encindered
[.] ENCIN'DERED, a. Burnt to cinders.

19111

encountered
[.] ENCOUNT'ERED, pp. Met face to face; met in opposition or hostility; opposed.

19112

encounterer
[.] ENCOUNT'ERER, n. One who encounters; an opponent; an antagonist.

19132

encumbered
[.] ENCUM'BERED, pp. Loaded; impeded in motion or operation, by a burden or difficulties; loaded with debts.

19147

endangered
[.] ENDANGERED, pp. Exposed to loss or injury.

19232

enfouldered
[.] ENFOUL'DERED, a. Mixed with lightning. [Not in use.] [.] 1. To make free of a city, corporation or state; to admit to the privileges of a freeman. The English colonies were enfranchised by special charters. [.] 2. To free or release from custody. [.] 3. To ...

19254

engendered
[.] ENGEN'DERED, pp. Begotten; caused; produced.

19255

engenderer
[.] ENGEN'DERER, n. He or that which engenders.

19453

ensphere
[.] ENSPHE'RE, v.t. [from sphere.] To place in a sphere. [.] 1. To make into a sphere. [.]

19478

entered
[.] EN'TERED, pp. Moved in; come in; pierced; penetrated; admitted; introduced; set down in writing.

19631

ephereral
[.] EPHER'ERAL

19761

equidifferent
[.] EQUIDIF'FERENT, a. Having equal differences; arithmetically proportional. [.] In crystalography, having a different number of faces presented by the prism and by each summit; and these three numbers form a series in arithmetical progression, as 6.4.2.

19837

ere
[.] ERE, adv. Before; sooner than. [.] [.] Ere sails were spread new oceans to explore. [.] [.] The nobleman saith to him, Sir, come down ere my child die. John 4. [.] In these passages, ere is really a preposition, followed by a sentence, instead of a single word, ...

19838

erebus
[.] ER'EBUS, n. [L. erebus.] In mythology, darkness; hence, the region of the dead; a deep and gloomy place; hell.

19839

erect
[.] ERECT', a. [L. erectus, from erigo, to set upright; e and rego, to stretch or make straight, right, rectus. See Right.] [.] 1. Upright, or in a perpendicular posture; as, he stood erect. [.] 2. Directed upward. [.] [.] And suppliant hands, to heaven erect. [.] 3. ...

19840

erectable
[.] ERECT'ABLE, a. That can be erected; as an erectable feather.

19841

erected
[.] ERECT'ED, pp. Set in a straight and perpendicular direction; set upright; raised; built; established; elevated; animated; extended and distended.

19842

erecter
[.] ERECT'ER, n. One that erects; one that raises or builds.

19843

erecting
[.] ERECT'ING, ppr. Raising and setting upright; building; founding; establishing; elevating; inciting; extending and distending.

19844

erection
[.] EREC'TION, n. The act of raising and setting perpendicular to the plane of the horizon; a setting upright. [.] 1. The act of raising or building, as an edifice or fortification; as the erection of a wall, or of a house. [.] 2. The state of being raised, built ...

19845

erective
[.] ERECT'IVE, a. Setting upright; raising.

19846

erectly
[.] ERECT'LY, adv. In an erect posture.

19847

erectness
[.] ERECT'NESS, n. Uprightness of posture or form.

19848

erector
[.] ERECT'OR, n. A muscle that erects; one that raises.

19849

erelong
[.] E'RELONG, adv. [ere and long.] Before a long time had elapsed. [.] [.] He mounted the horse, and following the stag, erelong slew him. [.] 1. Before a long time shall elapse; before long. Erelong you will repent of your folly. [.] [.] The world erelong a world ...

19850

eremitage
[.] ER'EMITAGE, n. [See Hermitage.]

19851

eremite
[.] ER'EMITE, n. [L. eremita; Gr.a desert.] One who lives in a wilderness, or in retirement, secluded from an intercourse with men. It is generally written hermit, which see.

19852

eremitical
[.] EREMIT'ICAL, a. Living in solitude, or in seclusion from the world.

19853

erenow
[.] E'RENOW, adv. [ere and now.] Before this time.

19854

ereption
[.] EREP'TION, n. [L. ereptio.] A taking or snatching away by force.

19855

erewhile
[.] E'REWHILE

19856

erewhiles
[.] E'REWHILES, adv. [ere and while. Some time ago; before a little while. [.] [.] I am as fair now as I was erewhile.

20056

ethereal
[.] ETHE'REAL, a. Formed of ether; containing or filled with ether; as ethereal space; ethereal regions. [.] 1. Heavenly; celestial; as ethereal messenger. [.] 2. Consisting of ether or spirit. [.] [.] Vast chain of being, which from God began, [.] [.] Natures ...

20057

ethereous
[.] ETHE'REOUS, a. Formed of ether; heavenly.

20238

everywhere
[.] EV'ERYWHERE, adv. [See Where, which signifies place.] In every place; in all places.

20582

exheredate
[.] EXHER'EDATE, v.t. [infra.] To disinherit.

20583

exheredation
[.] EXHEREDA'TION, n. [L. exhoeredatio, exhoeredo; ex and hoeres, an heir.] [.] In the civil law, a disinheriting; a father's excluding a child from inheriting any part of his estate.

21444

fathered
[.] F'ATHERED, pp. [.] 1. Adopted; taken as one's own; ascribed to one as the author. [.] 2. Having had a father of particular qualities. [.] I am no stronger than my sex, being so father'd and so husbanded. [Unusual.]

21548

feathered
[.] FEATH'ERED,

21549

featheredge
[.] FEATH'EREDGE,

21550

featheredged
[.] FEATH'EREDGED,

21654

fellow-sufferer
[.] FELLOW-SUF'FERER, n. One who shares in the same evil, or partakes of the same sufferings with another.

21728

fere
[.] FERE, n. A fellow; a mate; a peer. Obs.

21729

feretory
[.] FER'ETORY, n. [L. feretrum, a bier.] A place in a church for a bier.

21812

fethered
[.] FETH'ERED, pp. [.] 1. Covered with fethers; enriched. [.] 2. a. Clothed or covered with fethers. A fowl or bird is a fethered animal [.] Rise from the ground like feathered Mercury. [.] 3. Fitted or furnished with fethers; as a fethered arrow. [.] 4. ...

21813

fetheredge
[.] FETH'EREDGE, n. An edge like a fether. [.] A board that has one edge thinner than the other, is called featheredge stuff.

21814

fetheredged
[.] FETH'EREDGED, a. Having a thin edge.

21826

fettered
[.] FET'TERED, pp. Bound or confined by fetters; enchained.

21842

feuterer
[.] FEU'TERER, n. A dog keeper. [Not used.]

21850

feveret
[.] FE'VERET, n. A slight fever. [Not used.]

21996

filtered
[.] FIL'TERED, pp. Strained; defecated by a filter.

22029

finefingered
[.] FI'NEFINGERED, a. Nice in workmanship; dextrous at fine work.

22049

fingered
[.] FIN'GERED, pp. [.] 1. Played on; handled; touched. [.] 2. a. Having fingers. In botany, digitate; having leaflets like fingers.

22303

flattered
[.] FLAT'TERED, pp. Soothed by praise; pleased by commendation; gratified with hopes, false or well founded; wheedled.

22304

flatterer
[.] FLAT'TERER, n. One who flatters; a fawner; a wheedler; one who praises another, with a view to please him, to gain his favor, or to accomplish some purpose. [.] When I tell him he hates flatterers, [.] He says he does; being then most flattered. [.] The most ...

22365

fleerer
[.] FLEE'RER, n. a mocker; a fawner.

22532

flowered
[.] FLOW'ERED, pp. Embellished with figures of flowers.

22533

floweret
[.] FLOW'ERET, n. A small flower; a floret. [.] [In botany, floret is solely used.]

22583

flustered
[.] FLUS'TERED, pp. Heated with liquor; agitated; confused.

22589

fluttered
[.] FLUT'TERED, pp. Agitated; confused; disordered.

22638

foddered
[.] FOD'DERED, pp. Fed with dry food, or cut grass, &c.; as, to fodder cows.

22639

fodderer
[.] FOD'DERER, n. He who fodders cattle.

22887

foremembered
[.] FOREMEM'BERED, a. Called to mind previously.

22904

forereach
[.] FORERE'ACH, upon, v.t. In navigation, to gain or advance upon in progression or motion.

22905

foreread
[.] FORERE'AD, v.t. To signify by tokens. Obs.

22906

forereading
[.] FORERE'ADING, n. Previous perusal.

22907

forerecited
[.] FORERECI'TED, a. Named or recited before.

23136

fostered
[.] FOS'TERED, pp. Nourished; cherished; promoted.

23137

fosterer
[.] FOS'TERER, n. A nurse; one that feeds and nourishes in the place of parents.

23163

foundered
[.] FOUND'ERED, pp. Made lame in the feet by inflammation and extreme tenderness.

23359

freshwatered
[.] FRESH'WATERED, a. Newly watered; supplied with fresh water.

23422

fripperer
[.] FRIP'PERER, n. [See Frippery.] One who deals in old cloths.

23473

frontiered
[.] FRONTIE'RED, a. Guarded on the frontiers.

23535

fruiterer
[.] FRUITERER, n. One who deals in fruit; a seller of fruits.

23697

funereal
[.] FUNE'REAL, a. [.] 1. Suiting a funeral; pertaining to burial. [.] 2. Dark; dismal; mournful.

23751

furthered
[.] FUR'THERED, pp. Promoted; advanced.

23752

furtherer
[.] FUR'THERER, n. One who helps to advance; a promoter.

24077

gathered
[.] GATH'ERED, pp. Collected; assembled; contracted; plaited; drawn by inference.

24078

gatherer
[.] GATH'ERER, n. One who gathers or collects; one who gets in a crop.

24295

gerent
[.] GE'RENT, a. [L. gerens.] Bearing; used in Vicegerent.

24496

glandered
[.] GLAND'ERED, a. Affected with glanders.

24532

glaverer
[.] GLAV'ERER, n. A flatterer. [supra.]

25710

half-sphere
[.] H`ALF-SPHERE, n. Hemisphere.

25762

hammered
[.] HAM'MERED, pp. Beaten with a hammer.

25763

hammerer
[.] HAM'MERER, n. One who works with a hammer.

25770

hampered
[.] HAM'PERED, pp. Shackled; entangled; ensnared; perplexed.

26462

hemisphere
[.] HEM'ISPHERE, n. [Gr.] A half sphere; one half of a sphere or globe, when divided by a plane passing through its center. In astronomy, one half the mundane sphere. The equator divides the sphere into two equal parts. That on the north is called the northern hemisphere; ...

26513

heptamerede
[.] HEPTAM'EREDE, n. [Gr. seven, and part.] [.] That which divides into seven parts.

26562

here
[.] HERE, adv. [.] 1. In this place; in the place where the speaker is present; opposed to there. Behold, here am I. Lodge here this night. Build here seven altars. [.] 2. In the present life or state. [.] [.] Thus shall you be happy here, and more happy hereafter. [.] 3. ...

26563

hereaboutreabouts
[.] HE'REABOUT'REABOUTS, adv. About this place.

26564

hereafter
[.] HERE`AFTER, adv. In time to come; in some future time. [.] 1. In a future state. [.] HERE`AFTER,n. A future state. [.] [.] 'Tis heaven itself that points out an hereafter.

26565

hereat
[.] HEREAT', adv. At this. He was offended hereat, that is, at this saying, that fact, &c.

26566

hereby
[.] HEREBY', adv. By this. [.] [.] Hereby we became acquainted with the nature of things.

26567

hereditable
[.] HERED'ITABLE, a. [from the root of heir; L. haereditas.] [.] That may be inherited. [Not much used. See Inheritable.]

26568

hereditably
[.] HERED'ITABLY, adv. By inheritance; by right of descent. [.] [.] The one-house-owners belong hereditably to no private person.

26569

hereditament
[.] HEREDIT'AMENT, n. [L. haeres, haeredium. See Heir.] [.] Any species of property that may be inherited; lands, tenements,any thing corporeal or incorporeal, real, personal or mixed, that may descend to an heir. [.] A corporeal hereditament is visible and tangible; an incorporeal ...

26570

hereditarily
[.] HERED'ITARILY, adv. By inheritance; by descent from an ancestor.

26571

hereditary
[.] HERED'ITARY, a. [.] 1. That has descended from an ancestor. He is in possession of a large hereditary estate. [.] 2. That may descend from an ancestor to an heir; descendible to an heir at law. The crown of Great Britain is hereditary. [.] 3. That is or may ...

26572

herein
[.] HEREIN', adv. In this. [.] [.] Herein is my Father glorified,that ye bear much fruit. John 15.

26573

hereinto
[.] HEREIN'TO, adv. Into this.

26574

heremit
[.] HER'EMIT, n. A hermit.

26575

heremitical
[.] HEREMIT'ICAL, a. [It should rather be written hermitical.] [.] Solitary; secluded from society.

26576

hereof
[.] HEREOF', adv. Of this; from this. [.] [.] Hereof comes it that prince Harry is valiant.

26577

hereon
[.] HEREON', adv. On this.

26578

hereout
[.] HEREOUT', adv. Out of this place.

26579

heresiarch
[.] HER'ESIARCH, n. s as z. [Gr. heresy, and chief.] A leader in heresy; the chief of a sect of heretics.

26580

heresiarchy
[.] HER'ESIARCHY, n. Chief heresy.

26581

heresy
[.] HER'ESY, n. [Gr. to take, to hold; L. haeresis.] [.] 1. A fundamental error in religion, or an error of opinion respecting some fundamental doctrine of religion. But in countries where there is an established church, an opinion is deemed heresy, when it differs ...

26582

heretic
[.] HER'ETIC, n. [.] 1. A person under any religion, but particularly the christian, who holds and teaches opinions repugnant to the established faith, or that which is made the standard of orthodoxy. In strictness, among christians, a person who holds and avows religious ...

26583

heretical
[.] HERET'ICAL, a. Containing heresy; contrary to the established faith, or to the true faith.

26584

heretically
[.] HERET'ICALLY, adv. In an heretical manner; with heresy.

26585

heretoch
[.] HER'ETOCH, n. [L. duco, dux; Eng. to tug.] Among our Saxon ancestors,the leader or commander of an army, or the commander of the militia in a county or district. This officer was elected by the people in folkmote.

26586

heretofore
[.] HERETOFO'RE, adv. In times before the present; formerly.

26587

heretog
[.] HER'ETOG

26588

hereunto
[.] HEREUNTO', adv. To this.

26589

hereupon
[.] HEREUPON', adv. On this.

26590

herewith
[.] HEREWITH', adv. With this. [.] Most of the compounds of here and a preposition, are obsolete or obsolescent, or at least are deemed inelegant. But hereafter and heretofore are in elegant use. Herein and hereby are frequently used in the present version of the Scriptures, ...

26763

high-engendered
[.] HIGH-ENGEN'DERED, a. Engendered aloft, or in the air.

26802

high-towered
[.] HIGH-TOWERED, a. Having lofty towers.

26838

hindered
[.] HIN'DERED, pp. Stopped; impeded; obstructed; retarded.

26839

hinderer
[.] HIN'DERER, n. One who stops or retards; that which hinders.

26966

hoggerel
[.] HOG'GEREL, n. A sheep of the second year. [.] A two year old ewe.

27026

holstered
[.] HOLSTERED, a. Bearing holsters; as a holstered steed.

27407

hucksteress
[.] HUCK'STERESS, n. A female peddlar.

28070

imbittered
[.] IMBIT'TERED, pp. Made unhappy or painful; exasperated.

28079

imbordered
[.] IMBORD'ERED, pp. Furnished, inclosed or adorned with a border; bounded.

28089

imbowered
[.] IMBOW'ERED, pp. Covered with a bower; sheltered with trees.

28906

incoherence
[.] INCOHE'RENCE

28907

incoherency
[.] INCOHE'RENCY, n. [in and coherence.] [.] 1. Want of coherence; want of cohesion or adherence; looseness or unconnected state of parts, as of a powder. [.] 2. Want of connection; incongruity; inconsistency; want of agreement, or dependence of one part on another; ...

28908

incoherent
[.] INCOHE'RENT, a. [in and coherent.] [.] 1. Wanting cohesion; loose; unconnected; not fixed to each other; applied to material substances. [.] 2. Wanting coherence or agreement; incongruous; inconsistent; having no dependence of one part on another; as, the thoughts ...

28909

incoherently
[.] INCOHE'RENTLY, adv. Inconsistently; without coherence of parts; as, to talk incoherently.

29281

indifference
[.] INDIF'FERENCE, n. [L. indifferentia; in and differo, to differ. Indifferency is little used.] [.] 1. Equipoise or neutrality of mind between different persons or things; a state in which the mind is not inclined to one side more than the other; as when we see a contest ...

29282

indifferent
[.] INDIF'FERENT, a. [L. indifferens.] [.] 1. Neutral; not inclined to one side, party or thing more than to another. [.] [.] Cato knows neither of them, [.] [.] Indifferent in his choice to sleep or die. [.] 2. Unconcerned; feeling no interest,anxiety or care ...

29283

indifferently
[.] INDIF'FERENTLY, adv. Without distinction or preference; as, to offer pardon indifferently to all. [.] 1. Equally; impartially; without favor, prejudice or bias. [.] [.] --They may truly and indifferently minister justice. [.] 2. In a neutral state; without ...

29614

inference
[.] IN'FERENCE, n. A truth or proposition drawn from another which is admitted or supposed to be true; a conclusion. Inferences result from reasoning, as when the mind perceives such a connection between ideas, as that, if certain propositions called premises are true, ...

29623

infestered
[.] INFES'TERED, a. [in and fester.] Rankling; inveterate.

29815

inhere
[.] INHE'RE, v.i. [L. inhoereo; in and hoereo, to hang.] [.] To exist or be fixed in something else; as, colors inhere in cloth; a dart inheres in the flesh.

29816

inherence
[.] INHE'RENCE, n. Existence in something; a fixed state of being in another body or substance.

29817

inherent
[.] INHE'RENT, a. Existing in something else, so as to be inseparable from it. [.] [.] Inherent baseness. [.] 1. Innate; naturally pertaining to; as the inherent qualities of the magnet; the inherent right of men to life, liberty and protection.

29818

inherently
[.] INHE'RENTLY, adv. By inherence.

30108

insincere
[.] INSINCE'RE, a. [L. insincerus; in and sincerus, sincere.] [.] 1. Not sincere; not being in truth what one appears to be; dissembling; hypocritical; false; used of persons; as an insincere heart. [.] 2. Deceitful; hypocritical; false; used of things; as insincere ...

30109

insincerely
[.] INSINCE'RELY, adv. Without sincerity; hypocritically.

30160

insphere
[.] INSPHE'RE, v.t. [in and sphere.] To place in an orb or sphere.

30439

interequinoctial
[.] INTEREQUINOC'TIAL, a. [inter and equinox.] Coming between the vernal and autumnal equinoxes. [.] [.] Spring and autumn I have denominated equinoctial periods. Summer and winter I have called interequinoctial intervals.

30440

interess
[.] INTERESS, for interest, is obsolete.

30441

interest
[.] IN'TEREST, v.t. [L. inter and esse.] [.] 1. To concern; to affect; to excite emotion or passion, usually in favor,but sometimes against a person or thing. A narration of suffering interests us in favor of the sufferer. We are interested in the story or in the fate ...

30442

interested
... [.] IN'TERESTED, ...

30443

interesting
[.] IN'TERESTING, ppr. Giving a share or concern; as by interesting one in a voyage, or in a banking company. [.] 1. Engaging the affections; as by interesting a person in one's favor. [.] 2. Engaging the attention or curiosity; exciting emotions or passions; as ...

30444

interfere
[.] INTERFE'RE, v.i. [L. inter and fero, to bear, or ferio, to strike.] [.] 1. To interpose; to intermeddle; to enter into or take a part in the concerns of others. It is prudence not to interfere in party disputes, but from necessity. [.] 2. To clash; to come in ...

30445

interference
[.] INTERFE'RENCE, n. Interposition; an intermeddling; mediation. [.] 1. A clashing or collision. [.] 2. A striking of one foot against the other.

31102

irreverence
[.] IRREV'ERENCE, n. [L. irreverentia; in and reverentia. See Reverence.] [.] 1. Want of reverence, or want of veneration; want of due regard to the authority and character of the Supreme Being. Irreverence toward God is analogous to disrespect toward man. [.] 2. ...

31103

irreverent
[.] IRREV'ERENT, a. [.] 1. Wanting in reverence and veneration; not entertaining or manifesting due regard to the Supreme Being. [.] 2. Proceeding from irreverence; expressive of a want of veneration; as an irreverent thought, word or phrase. [.] 3. Wanting in ...

31104

irreverently
[.] IRREV'ERENTLY, adv. Without due regard to the authority and character of the Supreme being; in an irreverent manner. [.] 1. Without due respect to superiors.

31202

jabberer
[.] JAB'BERER, n. One that talks rapidly, indistinctly or unintelligibly.

31328

jeered
[.] JEE'RED, pp. Railed at; derided.

31329

jeerer
[.] JEE'RER, n. A scoffer; a railer; a scorner; a mocker.

32005

lackered
[.] LACK'ERED, pp. Covered with lacker; varnished.

32175

lanneret
[.] LAN'NERET, n. [L. laniarius, lanius, a butcher.] A species of hawk.

32274

latered
[.] LA'TERED, a. Delayed. Obs.

32330

launderer
[.] LAUNDERER, n. l'anderer. A man who follows the business of washing clothes.

32629

lere
[.] LERE, n. Learning; lesson; lore. Obs. [.] LERE, v.t. To learn; to teach. Obs.

32664

lettered
[.] LET'TERED, pp. Stamped with letters. [.] LET'TERED, a. [.] 1. Literate; educated; versed in literature or science.

32688

leveret
[.] LEV'ERET, n. A hare in the first year of her age.

32811

liferent
[.] LI'FERENT, n. The rent of an estate that continues for life.

32835

lightfingered
[.] LIGHTFINGERED, a. li'tefingered. Dexterous in taking and conveying away; thievish; addicted to petty thefts.

32884

lily-livered
[.] LILY-LIV'ERED, a. White-livered; cowardly. [Not used.]

32952

lingerer
[.] LIN'GERER, n. One who lingers.

33102

littered
[.] LIT'TERED, pp. [.] 1. Furnished with straw. [.] 2. a. Covered or overspread with litter, pieces, shreds, &c.

33117

livered
[.] LIV'ERED, a. Having a liver; as white-livered.

33245

loiterer
[.] LOIT'ERER, n. A lingerer; one that delays or is slow in motion; an idler; one that is sluggish or dilatory. [.] Ever listless loiterers, that attend no cause, no trust, no duty and no friend.

33713

mackerel
[.] MACK'EREL, n. [L. macula, a spot; the spotted fish.] [.] A species of fish of the genus Scomber, an excellent table fish. [.] MACK'EREL, n. A pander or pimp. [.] Mackerel-gale, in Dryden, may mean a gate that ripples the surface of the sea, or one which is suitable ...

33714

mackerel-sky
[.] MACK'EREL-SKY, n. A sky streaked or marked like a mackerel.

34031

maneuvered
[.] MANEU'VERED, pp. Moved in position.

34172

many-cornered
[.] MANY-COR'NERED, a. Having many corners,or more than twelve; polygonal.

34173

many-flowered
[.] MANY-FLOW'ERED, a. Having many flowers.

34177

many-mastered
[.] MANY-M`ASTERED, a. Having many masters.

34491

maunderer
[.] MAUND'ERER, n. A grumbler.

34672

meered
[.] MEE'RED, a. Relating to a boundary. [See Mere.]

34741

membered
[.] MEM'BERED, a. Having limbs.

34847

mere
[.] MERE, a. [L. merus.] This or that only; distinct from any thing else. [.] [.] From mere success nothing can be concluded in favor of a nation. [.] [.] What if the head,the eye or ear repin'd [.] [.] To serve mere engines to the ruling mind? [.] 1. Absolute; ...

34848

merely
[.] ME'RELY, adv. Purely; only; solely; thus and no other way; for this and no other purpose. [.] [.] Price not your life for other ends [.] [.] Than merely to oblige your friends.

34849

meretricious
[.] MERETRI'CIOUS, a. [L. meretricius, from meretrix, a prostitute.] [.] 1. Pertaining to prostitutes; such as in practiced by harlots; as meretricious arts. [.] 2. Alluring by false show; worn for disguise; having a gaudy but deceitful appearance; false; as meretricious ...

34850

meretriciously
[.] MERETRI'CIOUSLY ,adv. In the manner of prostitutes; with deceitful enticements.

34851

meretriciousness
[.] MERETRI'CIOUSNESS, n. The arts of a prostitute; deceitful enticements.

35015

mezereon
[.] MEZE'REON, n. A plant of the genus Daphne; the spurge olive.

35225

ministered
[.] MIN'ISTERED, pp. Served; afforded; supplied.

35556

misremembered
[.] MISREMEM'BERED, pp. Inaccurately recollected.

35607

mist-encumbered
[.] MIST-ENCUM'BERED, a. Loaded with mist.

35619

mistempered
[.] MISTEM'PERED, pp. Tempered ill.

35678

mitered
[.] MI'TERED, ppr. or a. Wearing a miter. [.] 1. Honored with the privilege of wearing a miter. [.] 2. Cut or joined at an angle of 45 degrees.

36281

muckerer
[.] MUCK'ERER, n. A miser; a niggard. [Not used.]

36442

murdered
[.] MUR'DERED, pp. Slain with malice prepense.

36443

murderer
[.] MUR'DERER, n. A person who in possession of his reason, unlawfully kills a human being with premeditated malice. [.] 1. A small piece of ordnance.

36444

murderess
[.] MUR'DERESS, n. A female who commits murder.

36556

muttered
[.] MUT'TERED, pp. Uttered in a low murmuring voice.

36557

mutterer
[.] MUT'TERER, n. A grumbler; one that mutters.

36932

nereid
[.] NEREID, n. In mythology, a sea nymph. In ancient monuments, the Nereids are represented as riding on sea horses, sometimes with the human form entire, and sometimes with the tail of a fish. They were the daughters of Nereus, and constantly attended Neptune.

37089

night-wanderer
[.] NIGHT-WANDERER, n. One roving at night.

37226

noli-me-tangere
[.] NOLI-ME-TANGERE, n. [L. Touch me not.] [.] 1. A plant of the genus Impatiens, called also balsamine; also, a plant of the genus Momordica, or male balsam apple, one species of which is called the wild or spurting cucumber. [.] 2. Among physicians, an ulcer or cancer, ...

37447

nowhere
[.] NO'WHERE, adv. Not in any place or state. Happiness is nowhere to be found but in the practice of virtue. [.] But it is better to write no and where as separate words.

37477

numbered
[.] NUM'BERED, pp. Counted; enumerated.

37478

numberer
[.] NUMBERER, n. One that counts numbers.

37919

offered
[.] OF'FERED, pp. Presented for acceptance or rejection; presented in worship or devotion; immolated; bid; presented to the eye or the mind.

37920

offerer
[.] OF'FERER, n. One that offers; one that sacrifices or dedicates in worship.

37926

officered
[.] OF'FICERED, pp. Furnished with officers.

38323

ordered
[.] OR'DERED, pp. Regulated; methodized; disposed; commanded; managed.

38324

orderer
[.] OR'DERER, n. [.] 1. One that gives orders. [.] 2. One that methodizes or regulates.

38537

otherwhere
[.] OTH'ERWHERE, adv. [other and where.] In some other place; or in other places.

38812

overeager
[.] OVERE'AGER, a. Too eager; too vehement in desire.

38813

overeagerly
[.] OVERE'AGERLY, adv. With excessive eagerness.

38814

overeagerness
[.] OVERE'AGERNESS, n. Excess of earnestness.

38815

overeat
[.] OVERE'AT, v.t. To eat to excess.

38816

overelegant
[.] OVEREL'EGANT, a. Elegant to excess.

38817

overempty
[.] OVEREMP'TY, v.t. To make too empty.

38818

overeye
[.] OVEREYE, v.t. [.] 1. To superintend; to inspect. [Little used.] [.] 2. To observe to remark.

39286

palterer
[.] PAL'TERER, n. One that palters, fails or falls short.

39292

pampered
[.] PAM'PERED, pp. Fed high; glutted or gratified to the full.

39996

pederero
[.] PEDERE'RO, n. [L. petra; Gr. so named from the use of stones in the charge, before the invention or iron balls.] [.] A swivel gun; sometimes written paterero.

40010

pedleress
[.] PED'LERESS, n. A female pedler.

40033

peeress
[.] PEE'RESS, n. The consort of a peer; a noble lady.

40210

peppered
[.] PEP'PERED, pp. Sprinkled with pepper; pelted; spotted.

40265

peregal
[.] PER'EGAL, a. Equal. [Not used.]

40266

peregrinate
[.] PER'EGRINATE, v.i. [L.peregrinor, from peregrinus, a traveler or stranger; peragro, to wander; per and ager.] [.] To travel from place to place or from one country to another; to live in a foreign country.

40267

peregrination
[.] PEREGRINA'TION, n. A traveling from one country to another; a wandering; abode in foreign countries.

40268

peregrinator
[.] PER'EGRINATOR, n. A traveler into foreign countries.

40269

peregrine
[.] PER'EGRINE, a. [L. peregrinus.] Foreign; not native. [Little used.] [.] Peregrine falcon, a species of hawk, the black hawk or falcon, found in America and in Asia, and which wanders in summer to the Arctic circle.

40270

perempt
[.] PEREMPT', v.t. [L. peremptus, perimo, to kill.] [.] In law, to kill; to crush or destroy. [Not used.]

40271

peremption
[.] PEREMP'TION, n. [L. peremptio.] A killing; a quashing; nonsuit. [Not used.]

40272

peremptorily
[.] PER'EMPTORILY, adv. [from peremptory.] Absolutely; positively; in a decisive manner; so as to preclude further debate. [.] [.] Never judge peremptorily on first appearances.

40273

peremptoriness
[.] PER'EMPTORINESS, n. Positiveness; absolute decision; dogmatism. [.] [.] Peremptoriness is of two sorts; one, a magisterialness in matters of opinion; the other, a positiveness in matters of fact.

40274

peremptory
[.] PER'EMPTORY, a. [L. peremptorius, from peremptus, taken away, killed.] [.] 1. Express; positive; absolute; decisive; authoritative; in a manner to preclude debate or expostulation. The orders of the commander are peremptory. [.] 2. Positive in opinion or judgment. ...

40275

perennial
[.] PEREN'NIAL, a. [L. perennis; per and annus, a year.] [.] 1. Lasting or continuing without cessation through the year. [.] 2. Perpetual; unceasing; never failing. [.] 3. In botany, continuing more than two years; as a perennial stem or root. [.] 4. Continuing ...

40276

perennially
[.] PEREN'NIALLY, adv. Continually; without ceasing.

40277

perennity
[.] PEREN'NITY, n. [L. perennitas.] An enduring or continuing through the whole year without ceasing.

40278

pererration
[.] PERERRA'TION, n. [L. perrro; per and erro, to wander.] [.] A wandering or rambling through various places.

40473

persevere
...hold on.] [.] To persist in any business or enterprise undertaken; to pursue steadily any design or course commenced; not to give over or abandon what is undertaken; applied alike to good and evil. [.] [.] Thrice happy, if they know [.] [.] Their happiness, and persevere ...

40533

perterebration
[.] PERTEREBRA'TION, n. [L. per and terebratio.] [.] The act of boring through.

40534

perterer
[.] PERT'ERER, n. One that troubles or harasses with vexation.

40595

pestered
[.] PEST'ERED, pp. Troubled; disturbed; annoyed.

40619

peterel
[.] PET'EREL

40678

pewterer
[.] PEW'TERER, n. One whose occupation is to make vessels and utensils of pewter.

40829

phylactered
[.] PHYLAC'TERED, a. Wearing a phylactery; dressed like the Pharisees.

40889

pickerel
[.] PICK'EREL, n. [from pike.] A small pike, a fish of the genus Esox.

40890

pickerel-weed
[.] PICK'EREL-WEED, n. A plant supposed to breed pickerels.

40950

pigeon-livered
[.] PIG'EON-LIVERED, a. Mild in temper; soft; gentle.

40983

pilfered
[.] PIL'FERED, pp. Stolen in small parcels.

40984

pilferer
[.] PIL'FERER, n. One that pilfers or practices petty theft.

41100

piqueerer
[.] PIQUEE'RER,n. A plunderer; a freebooter. [See Pickeerer.]

41256

planisphere
[.] PLAN'ISPHERE, n. [L. planus, plain, and sphere.] A sphere projected on a plane, in which sense, maps in which are exhibited the meridians and other circles, are planispheres.

41287

plastered
[.] PL`ASTERED, pp. Overlaid with plaster.

41288

plasterer
[.] PL`ASTERER, n. One that overlays with plaster. [.] 1. One that makes figures in plaster.

41499

plundered
[.] PLUN'DERED, pp. Pillaged; robbed.

41500

plunderer
[.] PLUN'DERER, n. A hostile pillager; a spoiler. [.] 1. A thief; a robber.

41796

pondered
[.] PON'DERED, pp. Weighed in the mind; considered; examined by intellectual operation.

41797

ponderer
[.] PON'DERER, n. One that weighs in his mind.

41933

porteress
[.] PORTERESS, n. [from porter.] A female guardian of a gate.

42103

poulterer
[.] POULTERER,n. [.] 1. One who makes it his business to sell fowls for the table. [.] 2. Formerly, in England, an officer of the king's household, who had the charge of the poultry.

42141

powdered
[.] POW'DERED, pp. Reduced to powder; sprinkled with powder; corned; salted.

42425

preference
[.] PREF'ERENCE, n. The act of preferring one thing before another; estimation of one thing above another; choice of one thing rather than another. [.] [.] Leave the critics on either side to contend about the preference due to this or that sort of poetry. [.] It ...

42589

preremote
[.] PREREMO'TE, a. [pre and remote.] More remote in previous time or prior order. [.] [.] In some cases, two more links of causation may be introduced; one of them may be termed the preremote cause, the other the postremote effect.

42590

prerequire
[.] PREREQUI'RE, v.t. [pre and require.] To require previously.

42591

prerequisite
[.] PREREQ'UISITE, a. s as z. [pre and requisite.] Previously required or necessary to something subsequent; as, certain attainments are prerequisite to an admission or orders. [.] PREREQ'UISITE, n. Something that is previously required or necessary to the end proposed. ...

42592

preresolve
[.] PRERESOLVE, v.t. s as z. [pre and resolve.] [.] To resolve previously.

42593

preresolved
[.] PRERESOLV'ED, pp. Resolved beforehand; previously determined.

42594

preresolving
[.] PRERESOLV'ING, ppr. Resolving beforehand.

43067

proffered
[.] PROF'FERED, pp. Offered for acceptance.

43068

profferer
[.] PROF'FERER, n. One who offers any thing for acceptance.

43367

prospered
[.] PROS'PERED, pp. Having success; favored.

43600

puckered
[.] PUCK'ERED, pp. Gathered in folds; wrinkled.

43637

puggered
[.] PUGGERED, for puckered, is not in use.

44075

quaere
[.] QUAERE, [L.] Inquire; better written query, which see.

44136

quartered
[.] QUART'ERED, pp. Divided into four equal parts or quarters; separated into distinct parts; lodged; stationed for lodging.

44160

quavered
[.] QUA'VERED, a. or pp. Distributed into quavers.

44161

quaverer
[.] QUA'VERER, n. A warbler.

44195

querele
[.] QUER'ELE, n. [L. querla.] A complaint to a court. [Not in use.]

44196

querent
[.] QUE'RENT, n. [L. querens, queror, to complain.] [.] The complainant; the plaintiff. [Not in use.] [.] QUE'RENT, n. [L. quaerens, quaero, to inquire.] [.] To inquirer. [Not much used.]

44250

quicksilvered
[.] QUICK'SILVERED, a. Overlaid with quicksilver.

44304

quinquereme
[.] QUIN'QUEREME, n. [L. quinque, five, and remus, oar.] [.] A galley having five seats or rows of oars.

44337

quivered
[.] QUIV'ERED, a. [from the noun quiver.] [.] 1. Furnished with a quiver; as the quivered nymph. [.] 2. Sheathed as in a quiver. [.] - Whose quills stand quivered at his ear.

44439

raftered
[.] R'AFTERED, a. Built or furnished with rafters.

44754

re-entered
[.] RE-EN'TERED, pp. Entered again.

45155

reconnoitered
[.] RECONNOIT'ERED, pp. Viewed; examined by personal observation.

45158

reconquered
[.] RECON'QUERED, pp. Conquered again; regained.

45166

reconsidered
[.] RECONSID'ERED, pp. Considered again; rescinded.

45194

recovered
[.] RECOVERED, pp. Regained; restored obtained by judicial decision.

45195

recoveree
[.] RECOVEREE', n. In law, the tenant or person against whom a judgment is obtained in common recovery.

45305

redelivered
[.] REDELIV'ERED, pp. Delivered back; liberated again.

45421

referee
[.] REFEREE', n. One to whom a thing is referred; particularly, a person appointed by a court to hear, examine and decide a cause between parties, pending before the court, and make report to the court. In New England, a referee differs from a arbitrator, in being appointed ...

45422

reference
[.] REF'ERENCE, n. [.] 1. A sending, dismission or direction to another for information. [.] 2. Relation; respect; view towards. [.] The christian religion commands sobriety, temperance and moderation, in reference to our appetites and passions. [.] 3. Allusion ...

45423

referendary
[.] REFEREND'ARY, n. [.] 1. One to whose decision a cause is referred. [Not in use.] [.] 2. An officer who delivered the royal answer to petitions.

45558

regathered
[.] REGATH'ERED, pp. Collected again.

45898

remembered
[.] REMEM'BERED, pp. Kept in mind; recollected.

45899

rememberer
[.] REMEM'BERER, n. One that remembers.

45988

rendered
[.] REN'DERED, pp. Returned; paid back; given; assigned; made; translated; surrendered; afforded.

46032

rentered
[.] REN'TERED, pp. Fine-drawn; sewed artfully together.

46033

renterer
[.] REN'TERER, n. a Fine-drawer.

46309

rere-mouse
[.] RE'RE-MOUSE, n. A bat. [See Rear-mouse.]

46310

rere-ward
[.] RE'RE-WARD, n. [rear and ward.] The part of an army that marches in the rear, as the guard; the rear guard. [The latter othography is to be preferred.] Num. 10. Is. 52.

46745

revere
[.] REVE'RE, v.t. [L. revereor; re and vereor, to fear.] [.] To regard with fear mingled with respect and affection; to venerate; to reverence; to honor in estimation. [.] Marcus Aurelius, whom he rather revered as his father, than treated as his partner in the empire ...

46746

revered
[.] REVE'RED, pp. Regarded with fear mingled with respect and affection.

46747

reverence
[.] REV'ERENCE, n. [L. reverentia.] [.] 1. Fear mingled with respect and esteem; veneration. [.] When quarrels and factions are carried openly, it is a sign that the reverence of government is lost. [.] The fear acceptable to God, is a filial fear, an awful reverence ...

46748

reverenced
[.] REV'ERENCED, pp. Regarded with fear mingled with respect and affection.

46749

reverencer
[.] REV'ERENCER, n. One that regards with reverence.

46750

reverencing
[.] REV'ERENCING, ppr. Regarding with fear mixed with respect and affection.

46751

reverend
[.] REV'EREND, a. [L. reverendus.] [.] 1. Worthy of reverence; entitled to respect mingled with fear and affection; as reverend and gracious senators. [.] A reverend sire among them came. [.] [This epithet is, I believe, never applied to the Supreme Being, or to ...

46752

reverent
[.] REV'ERENT, a. [.] 1. Expressing reverence, veneration or submission; as reverent words or terms; a reverent posture in prayer; reverent behavior. [.] 2. Submissive; humble; impressed with reverence. [.] They prostrate fell before him reverent.

46753

reverential
[.] REVEREN'TIAL, a. [from reverence.] Proceeding from reverence, or expressing it; as reverential fear or awe; reverential gratitude or esteem. [.] Religion - consisting in a reverential esteem of things sacred.

46754

reverentially
[.] REVEREN'TIALLY, adv. With reverence, or show of reverence.

46755

reverently
... [.] REV'ERENTLY, ...

46756

reverer
[.] REVE'RER, n. One who reveres or venerates.

47090

riveret
[.] RIV'ERET, n. A small river. [Not in use.]

47178

roisterer
[.] ROIST'ERER, n. A bold, blustering, turbulent fellow. [Not in use.]

47610

sabliere
[.] SAB'LIERE, n. [L. sabulum.] [.] 1. A sand pit. [Not much used.] [.] 2. In carpentry, a piece of timber as long, but not so thick as a beam.

47739

sakeret
[.] SAK'ERET, n. The male of the sakerhawk.

48080

saunterer
[.] S'AUNTERER, n. One that wanders about idly.

48250

scattered
[.] SCAT'TERED, pp. [.] 1. Dispersed; dissipated; thinly spread; sprinkled or thinly spread over. [.] 2. In botany, irregular in position; without any apparent regular order; as scattered branches.

48251

scatteredly
[.] SCAT'TEREDLY, adv. In a dispersed manner; separately. [Not much used.]

48273

sceptered
[.] SCEP'TERED, a. Bearing a scepter; as a sceptered prince. [.] To Britain's queen the scepter'd suppliant bends. [.] Gold-scepter'd Juno.

49002

self-centered
[.] SELF-CEN'TERED, a. [self and center.] Centered in itself. [.] The earth self-center'd and unmoved. Dryden.

49057

self-interest
[.] SELF-IN'TEREST, n. [self and interest.] Private interest; the interest or advantage of one's self.

49058

self-interested
[.] SELF-IN'TERESTED, a. Having self-interest; particularly concerned for one's self.

49075

self-preference
[.] SELF-PREF'ERENCE, n. [self and preference.] The preference of one's self to others.

49325

sequestered
[.] SEQUES'TERED, pp. Seized asnd detained for a time, to satisfy a demand; separated; also, being in retirement; secluded; private; as a sequestered situation.

49338

sere
[.] SERE, a. Dry; withered; usually written sear, which see. [.] SERE, n. A claw or talon. [Not in use.]

49339

serenade
[.] SERENA'DE, n. [from L. serenus, clear, serene.] [.] 1. Properly, music performed in a clear night; hence, an entertainment of music given in the night by a lover to his mistress under her window. It cosists of generally instrumental music, but that ...

49340

serenata
[.] SERENA'TA, n. A vocal piece of music on an armorous subject.

49341

serene
[.] SERE'NE, a. [L. serenus; Heb. Ch. Syr. Ar. to shine. Class Sr. No. 2. 23.47.] [.] 1. Clear or fair, and calm; as a serene sky; serene air; Serene imports great purity. [.] 2. Bright. [.] The moon, serene ...

49342

serenely
[.] SERE'NELY, adv. [.] 1. Calmly; quietly. [.] The setting sun now shown serenely bright. Pope. [.] 2. With unruffled temper; colly.

49343

sereneness
[.] SERE'NENESS, n. The state of being serene; serenity.

49344

serenitude
[.] SEREN'ITUDE, n. Calmness. [Not in use.]

49345

serenity
[.] SEREN'ITY, n. [L. serenitas.] [.] 1. Clearness and calmness; as the serenity of the air or sky. [.] 2. Calmness; quietness; stillness; peace. [.] A general peace and serenity newly succeeded general trouble. ...

49463

severe
[.] SEVE'RE, a. [L. severus.] [.] 1. Rigid; harsh; not mild or indulgent; as severe words; severe treatment; severe wrath. [.] 2. Sharp; hard rigorous. [.] Let your zeal-be more severe against thyself ...

49464

severely
[.] SEVE'RELY, adv. [.] 1. Harshly; sharply; as, the chide one severely. [.] 2. Strictly; rigorously; as, to judge one severely. [.] To be or fondly or severely kind. Savage. [.] 3. With extreme ...

49615

shattered
[.] SHAT'TERED, pp. Broken or dashed to pieces; rent; disordered.

49702

sheltered
[.] SHEL'TERED, pp. Covered from injury or annoyance; defended; protected.

49788

shivered
[.] SHIV'ERED, pp. Broken or dashed into small pieces.

49886

showered
[.] SHOW'ERED, pp. Wet with a shower; watered abundantly; bestowed or distributed liberally.

50010

sidereal
[.] SID'ERAL, SIDE'REAL, a. [L. sideralis, from sidus, a star.] [.] 1. Pertaining to a star or stars; astral; as sideral light. [.] 2. Containing stars; starry; as sidereal regions. Sidereal year, in astronomy, the period in which the fixed stars apparently complete ...

50125

silvered
[.] SIL'VERED, pp. Covered with a thin coat of silver; rendered smooth and lustrous; made white or a hoary.

50181

sincere
[.] SINCE'RE, a. [L. sincerus, which is said to be composed of sine, without, and cera, wax; as if applied originally to pure honey.] [.] 1. Pure; unmixed. As new-born babes, desire the sincere milk of the word. 1 Pet. 2. A joy which never was sincere till now. ...

50182

sincerely
[.] SINCE'RELY, adv. Honestly; with real purity of heart; without simulation or disguise; to love virtue sincerely.

50183

sincereness
[.] SINCE'RENESS, n. Sincerity.

50385

slabbererm
[.] SLAB'BERERM n. One that slabbers; an idiot.

50401

slandered
[.] SLA'NDERED, pp. Defamed; injured in good name by false and malicious reports.

50402

slanderer
[.] SLA'NDERER, n. A defamer; one who injures another by maliciously reporting something to his prejudice.

50433

slaughtered
[.] SLAUGHTERED, pp. slaw'tered. Slain; butchered.

50442

slavered
[.] SLAV'ERED, pp. Defiled with drivel.

50443

slaverer
[.] SLAV'ERER, n. A driveler; an idiot.

50526

slippered
[.] SLIP'PERED, a. Wearing slippers.

50591

slumberer
[.] SLUM'BERER, n. One that slumbers.

50634

smatterer
[.] SMAT'TERER, n. One who has only a slight superficial knowledge.

50772

sneerer
[.] SNEE'RER, n. One that sneers.

50860

sobered
[.] SO'BERED, pp. Make sober.

50945

soldieress
[.] SOLDIERESS, n. A female soldier. [Not in use.]

51031

somewhere
[.] SOMEWHERE, adv. [some and where.] In some place, unknown or not specified; in one place or another. He lives somewhere in obscurity. Dryden somewhere says peace to the manes of the dead.

51113

sorcerer
[.] SOR'CERER, [L. sors, lot.] A conjurer; an enchanter; a magician. The Egyptian sorcerers contended with Moses.

51114

sorceress
[.] SOR'CERESS, n. A female magician or enchantress.

51217

sovereign
[.] SOVEREIGN, a. suv'eran. [We retain this babarous orthography from the Norman sovereign. The true spelling would be suveran from the L. supernes, superus.] [.] 1. Supreme in power; possessing supreme dominion; as a sovereign ruler of the universe. [.] 2. Supreme; ...

51218

sovereignize
[.] SOVEREIGNIZE, v.i. suv'eranize. To exercise supreme authority. [Not in use.]

51219

sovereignly
[.] SOVEREIGNLY, adv. suv'eranly. Supreme power; supremacy; the possession power. Absolute sovereignty belongs to God only.

51323

spattered
[.] SPAT'TERED, pp. [.] 1. Sprinkling with moist some liquid or dirty substance. [.] 2. Aspersed.

51445

sphere
[.] SPHERE, n. [L. sphera.] [.] 1. In geometry, a solid body contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point called its center. The earth is not an exact sphere. The sun appears to be a sphere. [.] 2. An orb or globe of the ...

51522

spinthere
[.] SPIN'THERE, n. A mineral of a greenish gray color.

51594

splintered
[.] SPLINTERED, pp. Split into splinters; secured by splints.

51782

sputtered
[.] SPUTTERED, pp. Thrown out in small portions, as liquids; uttered with haste and indistinctness, as words.

51783

sputterer
[.] SPUTTERER, n. One that sputters.

51809

squandered
[.] SQUANDERED, pp. Spent lavishly and without necessity or use; wasted; dissipated, as property.

51810

squanderer
[.] SQUANDERER, n. One who spends his money prodigally, without necessity or use; a spendthrift; a prodigal; a waster; a lavisher.

51901

staggered
[.] STAGGERED, pp. Made to reel; made to doubt and waver.

51959

stammerer
[.] STAMMERER, n. One that stutters or hesitates in speaking.

52168

steered
[.] STEERED, pp. Directed and governed in a course; guided; conducted.

52169

steerer
[.] STEERER, n. One that steers; a pilot. [Little used.]

52234

stere
[.] STERE, n. In the new French system of measures, the unit for solid measure, equal to a cubic meter.

52235

stereographic
[.] STEREOGRAPHIC, STEREOGRAPHICAL, a. [from stereography.] Made or done according to the rules of stereography; delineated on a plane; as a stereographic chart of the earth.

52236

stereographical
[.] STEREOGRAPHIC, STEREOGRAPHICAL, a. [from stereography.] Made or done according to the rules of stereography; delineated on a plane; as a stereographic chart of the earth.

52237

stereographically
[.] STEREOGRAPHICALLY, adv. By delineation on plane.

52238

stereography
[.] STEREOGRAPHY, n. [Gr., firm; to write.] The act or art of delineating the forms of solid bodies on a plane; a branch of solid geometry which shows the construction of all solids which are regularly defined.

52239

stereometrical
[.] STEREOMETRICAL, a. [See Stereometry.] Pertaining to or performed by stereometry.

52240

stereometry
[.] STEREOMETRY, n. [Gr., firm, fixed; to measure.] The art of measuring solid bodies, and finding their solid content.

52241

stereotomical
[.] STEREOTOMICAL, a. Pertaining to or performed by stereotomy.

52242

stereotomy
[.] STEREOTOMY, n. [Gr., fixed; to cut.] The science or art of cutting solids into certain figures or sections, as arches, &c.

52243

stereotype
[.] STEREOTYPE, n. [Gr., fixed; type, form.] [.] 1. Literally, a fixed metal type; hence, a plate of fixed or solid metallic types for printing books. Thus we say, a book is printed on stereotype, or in stereotype. In the latter use, the word seems rather to signify the ...

52244

stereotyper
[.] STEREOTYPER, n. One who makes stereotype.

52245

stereotyping
[.] STEREOTYPING, ppr. Making stereotype plates for any work; or impressing copies on stereotype plates.

52246

stereotypographer
[.] STEREOTYPOGRAPHER, n. A stereo-type printer.

52247

stereotypography
[.] STEREOTYPOGRAPHY, n. The art or practice of printing on stereotype.

52507

stoppered
[.] STOPPERED, pp. Closed with a stopper; as a stoppered retort.

52837

stutterer
[.] STUTTERER, n. A stammerer.

53233

suffered
[.] SUF'FERED, pp. Borne; undergone; permitted; allowed.

53234

sufferer
[.] SUF'FERER, n. One who endures or undergoes pain, either of body or mind; one who sustains inconvenience or loss; as suffers by poverty or sickness. Men are sufferers by fire or losses at sea; they are sufferers by the ravages of an enemy; still more are they sufferers ...

53377

sundered
[.] SUN'DERED, pp. Separated; divided; parted.

53426

supereminence
[.] SUPEREM'INENCE

53427

supereminency
[.] SUPEREM'INENCY, n. [L. super and emineo.] Eminence superior to what is common; distinguished eminence; as the supereminence of Cicero as an orator; the supereminence of Dr. Johnson as a writer, or of lord Chatham as a statesman.

53428

supereminent
[.] SUPEREM'INENT, a. Eminent in a superior degree; surpassing others in excellence; as a supereminent divine; the supereminent glory of Christ.

53429

supereminently
[.] SUPEREM'INENTLY, adv. In a superior degree of excellence; with unusual distinction.

53430

supererogant
[.] SUPERER'OGANT, a. Supererogatory, which see.

53431

supererogate
[.] SUPERER'OGATE, v.i. [L. super and erogatio, erogo.] To do more than duty requires. Aristotle's followers have supererogated in observance. [Little used.]

53432

supererogation
[.] SUPEREROGA'TION, n. [supra.] Performance of more than duty requires. [.] [.] There is no such thing as works of supererogation.

53433

supererogative
[.] SUPEREROG'ATIVE, a. Supererogatory. [Not much used.]

53434

supererogatory
[.] SUPEREROG'ATORY, a. Performed to an extent not enjoined or not required by duty; as supererogatory services.

53435

superessential
[.] SUPERESSEN'TIAL, a. [super and essential.] Essential above others, or above the constitution of a thing.

53436

superexalt
[.] SUPEREXALT', v.t. [super and exalt.] To exalt to a superior degree.

53437

superexaltation
[.] SUPEREXALTA'TION, n. [super and exaltation.] Elevation above the common degree.

53438

superexcellence
[.] SUPEREX'CELLENCE, n. [super and excellence.] Superior excellence.

53439

superexcellent
[.] SUPEREX'CELLENT, a. Excellent in an uncommon degree; very excellent.

53440

superexcrescence
[.] SUPEREXCRES'CENCE, n. [super and excrescence.] Something superfluously growing.

53738

surrendered
[.] SURREN'DERED, pp. Yielded or delivered to the power of another; given up; resigned.

53739

surrenderee
[.] SURRENDEREE', n. In law, a person to whom the lord grants surrendered land; the cestuy que use.

53842

swaggerer
[.] SWAG'GERER, n. A blusterer; a bully; a boastful noisy fellow.

53963

sweltered
[.] SWELT'ERED, pp. Oppressed with heat.

54248

tabrere
[.] TAB'RERE, n. A taborer.

54284

tafferel
[.] TAF'FEREL, n. The upper part of a ship's stern, which is flat like a table on the top, and sometimes ornamented with carved work.

54510

tattered
[.] TAT'TERED, pp. or a. Rent; torn; hanging in rags; as a tattered garment. [.] [.] Where wav'd the tatter'd ensigns of Rag-fair.

54665

tempered
[.] TEM'PERED, pp. Duly mixed or modified; reduced to a proper state; softened; allayed; hardened. [.] 1. Adjusted by musical temperament. [.] 2. a. Disposed; as a well tempered, good tempered, or bad tempered man.

54729

tendered
[.] TEND'ERED, pp. Offered for acceptance.

54772

tentered
[.] TENT'ERED, pp. Stretched or hung on tenters.

54795

terebinth
[.] TER'EBINTH, n. The turpentine tree.

54796

terebinthinate
[.] TEREBIN'THINATE, a. Terebinthine; impregnated with the qualities of turpentine.

54797

terebinthine
[.] TEREBIN'THINE, a. [L. terebinthinus, from terebinthina, turpentine.] Pertaining to turpentine; consisting of turpentine, or partaking of its qualities.

54798

terebrate
[.] TER'EBRATE, v.t. [L. terebro, tero.] To bore; to perforate with a gimlet. [Little used.]

54799

terebration
[.] TEREBRA'TION, n. The act of boring. [Little used.]

54800

terebratulite
[.] TEREBRAT'ULITE, n. Fossil terebratula, a kind of shell.

54801

teredo
[.] TERE'DO, n. [L. from tero, to wear.] A worm that bores and penetrates the bottom of ships; or rather a genus of worms, so called.

54802

terek
[.] TER'EK, n. A water fowl with long legs.

54803

teret
[.] TER'ET

54804

terete
[.] TERE'TE, a. [L. teres.] Round and tapering; columnar; as the stem of a plant.

55066

there
[.] THERE, adv. [.] 1. In that place. [.] [.] The Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden, and there he put the man whom he had formed. Gen.2. [.] 2. It is sometimes opposed to here; there denoting the place most distant. [.] [.] Darkness there might well ...

55067

thereabout
[.] THEREABOUT'

55068

thereabouts
[.] THEREABOUTS', adv. [there and about. The latter is less proper, but most commonly used.] [.] 1. Near that place. [.] 2. Nearly; near that number, degree or quantity; as ten men or thereabouts. [.] 3. Concerning that. [Not much used.] Luke 24.

55069

thereafter
[.] THERE`AFTER, adv. [there and after.] [.] 1. According to that; accordingly. [.] [.] When you can draw the head indifferently well, proportion the body thereafter. [.] 2. After that.

55070

thereat
[.] THEREAT', adv. [there and at.] At that place. [.] [.] Wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there are who go in thereat. Matt 7. [.] 1. At that; at that thing or event; on that account. [.] [.] Every error is a stain ...

55071

thereby
[.] THEREBY', adv. [there and by.] By that; by that means; in consequence of that. [.] [.] Acquaint now thyself with him, and be at peace; thereby good shall come to thee. Job 22.

55072

therefor
[.] THEREFOR', adv. [there and for.] For that or this, or it.

55073

therefore
[.] THEREFORE, adv. ther'fore. [there and for.] [.] 1. For that; for that or this reason, referring to something previously stated. [.] [.] I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come. [.] Luke 14. [.] 2. Consequently. [.] [.] He blushes; therefore he ...

55074

therefrom
[.] THEREFROM', adv. [there and from.] From this or that. [.] [.] --Turn not aside therefrom to the right hand or to the left. Josh. 23.

55075

therein
[.] THEREIN', adv. [there and in.] In that or this place, time or thing. [.] [.] Bring forth abundantly in the earth and multiply therein. Gen.9. [.] [.] Ye shall keep the sabbath--whosoever doeth any work therein--that soul shall be cut off. Ex.31. [.] [.] ...

55076

thereinto
[.] THEREINTO', adv. [there and into.] Into that.

55077

thereof
[.] THEREOF',adv. [there and of.] Of that or this. [.] [.] In the day thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die. Gen.2.

55078

thereon
[.] THEREON', adv. [there and on.] On that or this. [.] [.] Then the king said, hang him thereon. Esth.7.

55079

thereout
[.] THEREOUT', adv. [there and out.] Out of that or this. Lev.2.

55080

thereto
[.] THERETO'

55081

thereunder
[.] THEREUN'DER, adv. [there and under.] Under that or this.

55082

thereunto
[.] THEREUNTO', adv. [there and to or unto.] To that or this. [.] [.] Add the fifth part thereto. Lev.5.

55083

thereupon
[.] THEREUPON', adv. [there and upon.] Upon that or this. [.] [.] The remnant of the house of Judah, they shall feed thereupon. Zeph.2. [.] 1. In consequence of that. [.] [.] He hopes to find you forward, [.] [.] And thereupon he sends you this good news. [.] 2. ...

55084

therewhile
[.] THEREWHI'LE, adv. [there and while.] At the same time.

55085

therewith
[.] THEREWITH', adv. [there and with.] With that or this. [.] [.] I have learned in whatever state I am, therewith to be content. Phil.4.

55086

therewithal
[.] THEREWITHAL', adv. [there and withal.] [.] 1. Over and above. [.] 2. At the same time. [.] 3. With that. [This word is obsolete.] [.] [The foregoing compounds of there with the prepositions, are for the most part deemed inelegant and obsolete. Some of them ...

55240

three-cornered
[.] THREE'-CORNERED, a. [three and corner.] [.] 1. Having three corners or angles; as a three-cornered hat. [.] 2. In botany, having three sides, or three prominent longitudinal angles, as a stem.

55241

three-flowered
[.] THREE'-FLOWERED, a. [three and flower.] [.] Bearing three flowers together.

55337

thunderer
[.] THUN'DERER, n. He that thunders.

55451

timbered
[.] TIM'BERED, pp. or a. Furnished with timber; as a well timbered house. In the United States, we say, land is well timbered,when it is covered with good timber trees. [.] 1. Built; formed; contrived. [Little used.]

55645

toll-gatherer
[.] TOLL-GATHERER, n. The man who takes toll.

55858

towered
[.] TOW'ERED, a. Adorned or defended by towers.

56969

two-flowered
[.] TWO-FLOWERED, a. Bearing two flowers at the end, as a peduncle.

57036

uddered
[.] UD'DERED, a. Furnished with udders.

57046

ulcered
[.] UL'CERED, a. Having become an ulcer.

57077

umbered
[.] UM'BERED, a. [L. umbra, a shade.] [.] 1. Shaded; clouded. [.] 2. [from umber.] Painted with umber.

57097

umbriere
[.] UMBRIE'RE, n. The visor of a helmet.

57157

unadministered
[.] UNADMIN'ISTERED, a. Not administered.

57205

unaltered
[.] UNAL'TERED, a. Not altered or changed.

57239

unanswered
[.] UN'ANSWERED, a. [.] 1. Not answered; not opposed by a reply. [.] 2. Not refuted. [.] 3. Not suitably returned.

57307

unattempered
[.] UNATTEM'PERED, a. Not tempered by mixture.

57340

unbannered
[.] UNBAN'NERED, a. Having no banner.

57350

unbattered
[.] UNBAT'TERED, a. Not battered; not bruised or injured by blows.

57526

unceremonial
[.] UNCEREMO'NIAL, a. Not ceremonial.

57527

unceremonious
[.] UNCEREMO'NIOUS, a. not ceremonious; not formal.

57602

uncloistered
[.] UNCLOIS'TERED, pp. Released from a cloister or from confinement.

57710

unconquered
[.] UNCON'QUERED, a. [.] 1. Not vanquished or defeated. [.] 2. Unsubdued; not brought under control. [.] 3. Invincible; insuperable.

57721

unconsidered
[.] UNCONSID'ERED, a. Not considered; not attended to.

57789

uncovered
[.] UNCOVERED, pp. Divested of a covering or clothing; laid open to view; made bare.

57815

uncumbered
[.] UNCUM'BERED, a. Not burdened; not embarrassed.

57858

undeciphered
[.] UNDECI'PHERED, a. Not deciphered or explained.

57891

undelivered
[.] UNDELIV'ERED, a. Not delivered; not communicated.

58088

undiscovered
[.] UNDISCOVERED, a. Not discovered; not seen; not descried.

58097

undisordered
[.] UNDISOR'DERED, a. s as z. Not disordered; not disturbed.

58111

undistempered
[.] UNDISTEM'PERED, a. [.] 1. Not diseased; free from malady. [.] 2. Free from perturbation.

58197

unembittered
[.] UNEMBIT'TERED, a. Not embittered; not aggravated.

58201

unempowered
[.] UNEMPOW'ERED, a. Not empowered or authorized.

58206

unencumbered
[.] UNENCUM'BERED, pp. [.] 1. Disengaged from incumbrance. [.] 2. a. Not encumbered; not burdened.

58329

unfathered
[.] UNF'ATHERED, a. Fatherless.

58343

unfeathered
[.] UNFEATH'ERED,

58359

unfethered
[.] UNFETH'ERED, a. Having no feathers; unfledged; implumous; naked of feathers.

58361

unfettered
[.] UNFET'TERED, pp. [.] 1. Unchained; unshackled; freed from restraint. [.] 2. a. Not restrained.

58379

unflattered
[.] UNFLAT'TERED, a. Not flattered.

58414

unfostered
[.] UNFOS'TERED, a. [.] 1. Not fostered; not nourished. [.] 2. Not countenanced by favor; not patronized.

58454

ungartered
[.] UNG'ARTERED, a. Being without garters.

58455

ungathered
[.] UNGATH'ERED, a. Not gathered; not cropped; not picked.

58591

unhindered
[.] UNHIN'DERED, a. Not hindered; not opposed; exerting itself freely.

58663

unincumbered
[.] UNINCUM'BERED, a. [.] 1. Not incumbered; not burdened. [.] 2. Free from any temporary estate or interest, or from mortgage, or other charge or debt; as an estate unincumbered with dower.

58665

unindifferent
[.] UNINDIF'FERENT, a. Not indifferent; not unbiased; partial; leaning to one party.

58696

uninterested
... [.] UNIN'TERESTED, ...

58697

uninteresting
[.] UNIN'TERESTING, a. Not capable of exiting an interest, or of engaging the mind or passions; as an uninteresting story or poem.

58813

unlettered
[.] UNLET'TERED, a. Unlearned; untaught; ignorant.

58814

unletteredness
[.] UNLET'TEREDNESS, n. Want of learning.

58874

unmannered
[.] UNMAN'NERED, a. Uncivil; rude.

58890

unmastered
[.] UNM'ASTERED, a. [.] 1. Not subdued; not conquered. [.] 2. Not conquerable. [.] He cannot his unmaster'd grief sustain.

58994

unnumbered
[.] UNNUM'BERED, a. Not numbered; innumerable; indefinitely numerous.

59020

unoffered
[.] UNOF'FERED, a. Not offered; not proposed to acceptance.

59134

unplastered
[.] UNPL'ASTERED, a. Not plastered.

59152

unplundered
[.] UNPLUN'DERED, a. Not plundered or stripped.

59175

unpowdered
[.] UNPOW'DERED, a. Not sprinkled with powder.

59321

unrecovered
[.] UNRECOVERED, a. [.] 1. Not recovered; not recalled into possession; not regained. [.] 2. Not restored to health.

59342

unregistered
[.] UNREG'ISTERED, a. Not registered; not recorded.

59356

unremembered
[.] UNREMEM'BERED, a. Not remembered; not retained in the mind; not recollected.

59418

unreverend
[.] UNREV'EREND, a. [.] 1. Not reverend. [.] 2. Disrespectful; irreverent; as an unreverend tongue.

59419

unreverent
[.] UNREV'ERENT, a. Irreverent. [The latter is chiefly used.]

59420

unreverently
[.] UNREV'ERENTLY, adv. Irreverently, which see.

59508

unscattered
[.] UNSCAT'TERED, a. Not scattered; not dispersed; not thrown into confusion.

59564

unsepulchered
[.] UNSEP'ULCHERED, a. Having no grave; unburied.

59575

unsevered
[.] UNSEV'ERED, a. Not severed; not parted; not divided.

59596

unsheltered
[.] UNSHEL'TERED, a. Not sheltered; not screened; not defended from danger or annoyance.

59606

unshowered
[.] UNSHOW'ERED, a. Not watered or sprinkled by showers; as unshowered grass.

59618

unsilvered
[.] UNSIL'VERED, a. Not covered with quicksilver; as an unsilvered mirror.

59619

unsincere
[.] UNSINCE'RE, a. [.] 1. Not sincere; hypocritical. [See Insincere.] [.] 2. Not genuine; adulterated. [.] 3. Not sound; not solid. [.] [Obsolete in the two last significations, and for the first, insincere is generally used.]

59651

unsoldiered
[.] UNSOLDIERED, a. Not having the qualities of a soldier. [Not in use.]

59684

unsphere
[.] UNSPHE'RE, v.t. To remove from its orb.

59818

untempered
[.] UNTEM'PERED, a. Not tempered; not duly mixed for use; not durable or strong.

59825

untendered
[.] UNTEND'ERED, a. Not tendered; not offered; as untendered money or tribute.

59856

untimbered
[.] UNTIM'BERED, a. [.] 1. Not furnished with timber. [.] 2. Not covered with timber trees; as untimbered land.

59908

untuckered
[.] UNTUCK'ERED, a. Having no tucker; as an untuckered neck.

59976

unwatered
[.] UNWATERED, a. [See Water.] Not watered; dry.

60021

unwithered
[.] UNWITH'ERED, a. Not withered or faded.

60079

upholsterer
[.] UPHOLSTERER, n. [from up and hold.] One who furnishes houses with beds, curtains and the like.

60174

ushered
[.] USH'ERED, pp. Introduced.

60212

uttered
[.] UT'TERED, pp. Spoken; pronounced; disclosed; published; put into circulation.

60213

utterer
[.] UT'TERER, n. [.] 1. One who utters; one who pronounces. [.] 2. One who divulges or discloses. [.] 3. One who puts into circulation. [.] 4. A seller; a vender.

60443

veered
[.] VEE'RED, pp. turned; changed in direction; let out.

60503

veneered
[.] VENEE'RED, pp. Inlaid; ornamented with marquetry.

60522

venereal
[.] VENE'REAL, a. [L. venereus, from Venus. See Venus.] [.] 1. Pertaining to the pleasures of sexual commerce. A venereal person is one addicted to sexual pleasures or venery. [.] 2. Proceeding from sexual intercourse; as the venereal disease; venereal virus or ...

60523

venerean
[.] VENE'REAN, a. Venereal. [Not used.]

60524

venereous
[.] VENE'REOUS, a. [L. venereus.] Lustful; libidinous.

60597

verderer
[.] VER'DERER,

60604

verecund
[.] VER'ECUND, a. [L. vrcundus.] Bashful; modest. [Not much used.]

60605

verecundity
[.] VERECUND'ITY, n. Bashfulness; modesty; blushing. [Not in much use.]

60777

vicegerency
[.] VICEGE'RENCY, n. [See Vicegerent.] The office of a vicegerent; agency under another; deputed power; lieutenancy.

60778

vicegerent
[.] VICEGE'RENT, n. [L. vicem gereus, acting in the place of another.] [.] A lieutenant; a vicar; an officer who is deputed by a superior or by proper authority to exercise the powers of another. Kings are sometimes called God's vicegerents. It is to be wished they ...

61233

wagered
[.] WAGERED, pp. Laid; pledged; as a bet.

61234

wagerer
[.] WAGERER, n. One who wagers or lays a bet.

61331

wanderer
[.] WANDERER, n. A rambler; one that roves; one that deviates from duty.

61581

watered
[.] WATERED, pp. Overspread or sprinkled with water; made wet; supplied with water; made lustrous by being wet and calendered.

61582

waterer
[.] WATERER, n. One who waters.

61607

waverer
[.] WAVERER, n. One who wavers; one who is unsettled in doctrine, faith or opinion.

61704

weathered
[.] WEATHERED, pp. Passed to the windward; passed with difficulty.

61806

well-mannered
[.] WELL-MANNERED, a. [well and manner.] Polite; well-bred; complaisant.

61840

were
[.] WERE, pron. er, which when prolonged, becomes ware. This is used as the imperfect tense plural of be; we were, you were, they were; and in some other tenses. It is the Danish verb vaerer, to be, to exist, and in origin has no connection with be, nor with was. It is ...

61841

weregild
[.] WEREGILD, n. Formerly, the price of a mans head; a compensation paid for a man killed, partly to the king for the loss of a subject, and partly tot he lord of the vassal, and partly to the next of kin. It was paid by the murderer.

61911

where
[.] WHERE, adv. [.] 1. At which place or places. [.] [.] She visited the place where first she was so happy-- [.] [.] In all places where I record my name, I will come to thee and I will bless thee. Exodus 20. [.] 2. At or in what place. [.] [.] Adam, where art ...

61912

whereabout
[.] WHEREABOUT, adv. [where and about.] [.] 1. Near what place. Whereabout did you meet your friend? [.] 2. Near which place. [.] 3. Concerning which. [.] [.] The object whereabout they are conversant.

61913

whereas
[.] WHEREAS, adv. s as z. [where and as.] [.] 1. When in fact or truth, implying opposition to something that precedes. [.] [.] Are not those found to be the greatest zealots, who are most notoriously ignorant? Whereas true zeal should always begin with true knowledge. [.] 2. ...

61914

whereat
[.] WHEREAT, adv. [where and at.] [.] 1. At which. [.] [.] Whereat he was no less angry and ashamed, than desirous to obey Zelmane. [.] 2. At what, interrogatively. Whereat are you offended?

61915

whereby
[.] WHEREBY, adv. [where and by.] [.] 1. By which. [.] [.] You take my life, when you do take the means whereby I live. [.] 2. By what, interrogatively. [.] [.] Whereby shall I know this? Luke 1.

61916

whereever
[.] WHEREEVER, adv. [where and ever.] At whatever place. [.] [.] He cannot but love virtue, wherever it is.

61917

wherefore
[.] WHEREFORE, adv. [where and for.] [.] 1. For which reason. [.] [.] Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them. Matthew 7. [.] 2. Why; for what reason. [.] [.] Wherefore didst thou doubt? Matthew 14.

61918

wherein
[.] WHEREIN, adv. [where and in.] [.] 1. In which; in which thing, time, respect, book, &c. This is the thing wherein you have erred. [.] 2. In what. [.] [.] Yet ye say, wherein have we wearied him? Malachi 2.

61919

whereinto
[.] WHEREINTO, adv. [where and into.] Into which.

61920

whereness
[.] WHERENESS, n. Ubiety; imperfect locality. [.] [.] A point hath no dimensions, but only a whereness, and is next to nothing. [.] [This word is not used, nor has it any intelligible signification.]

61921

whereof
[.] WHEREOF, adv. [where and of.] [.] 1. Of which. We are not guilty of the crime whereof we are accused. [.] 2. Of what. Whereof was this house built? [.] [.] How this world, when and whereof created--

61922

whereon
[.] WHEREON, adv. [where and on.] [.] 1. On which; as the ground whereon we tread. [.] 2. On what. Whereon do we stand?

61923

whereso
[.] WHERESO, adv. [See Wheresoever.]

61924

wheresoever
[.] WHERESOEVER, adv. [where, so, and ever.] In what place soever; in whatever place, or in any place indefinitely. Seize the thief, wheresoever he may be found. [Wherever is the preferable word.]

61925

wherethrough
[.] WHERETHROUGH, through which, is not in use.

61926

whereto
[.] WHERETO, adv. [where and to.] [.] 1. To which. [.] [.] Whereto we have already attained-- Philippians 3. [.] 2. To what; to what end. [Little used.]

61927

whereunto
[.] WHEREUNTO, adv. [where and unto.] The same as whereto. [Little used.]

61928

whereupon
[.] WHEREUPON, adv. Upon which. [.] [.] The townsmen mutinied and sent to Essex, whereupon he came thither.

61929

wherewith
[.] WHEREWITH, adv. [where an with.] [.] 1. With which. [.] [.] The love wherewith thou hast loved me. John 17. [.] 2. With what, interrogatively. [.] [.] Wherewith shall I save Israel? Judges 6.

61930

wherewithal
[.] WHEREWITHAL, adv. [See Withal.] [where, with, and all.] The same as wherewith.

61958

whilere
[.] WHILERE, adv. [while and ere.] A little while ago.

62017

whiskered
[.] WHISKERED, a. Formed into whiskers; furnished with whiskers.

62022

whispered
[.] WHISPERED, pp. Uttered in a low voice; uttered with suspicion or caution.

62023

whisperer
[.] WHISPERER, n. [.] 1. One who whispers. [.] 2. A tattler; one who tells secrets; a conveyer of intelligence secretly. [.] 3. A backbiter; one who slanders secretly. Proverbs 16.

62057

white-livered
[.] WHITE-LIVERED, a. [white and liver.] [.] 1. Having a pale look; feeble; cowardly. [.] 2. Envious; malicious.

62188

wildered
[.] WILDERED, pp. Lost in a pathless tract; puzzled.

62322

wintered
[.] WINTERED, pp. Kept through the winter.

62388

withered
[.] WITHERED, pp. Faded; dried; shrunk.

62389

witheredness
[.] WITHEREDNESS, n. The state of being withered.

62453

wolverene
[.] WOLVERIN, WOLVERENE, n. The glutton, a carnivorous animal of voracious appetite. The name wolverene is applied to an animal of North America, considered by Linne as a peculiar species, (Ursus luscus, ) cut which has been since regarded as a variety of the glutton, (U. ...

62471

wonderer
[.] WONDERER, n. One who wonders.

62519

wood-seere
[.] WOOD-SEERE, n. The time when there is no sap in a tree.

62841

yfere
[.] YFERE, adv. Together. [Not in use.]

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

36

333

26

365

38

334

Why 1828?

0
3
 


As I study the scriptures, there are words that are now antiquated but I want to know the meaning of. I can find the meaning in time but this dictionary takes me to that time period and supplies what I need for a true contextual understanding.

— Barbara (Avondale, AZ)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

braggardism

BRAG'GARDISM, n. Boastfulness; vain ostentation.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

76

177

Compact Edition

70

33

CD-ROM

49

29

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.352 seconds. [1828: 21, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top