HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Saturday - December 9, 2023

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comSEARCHING -word- for [cry]

Your search query [ cry ] returned 50 results.
ID Word Definition

3037

apocrypha
... authenticity, as inspired writings, is not admitted, and which are therefore not considered a part of the sacred canon of the scripture. When the Jews published their sacred books, they called them canonical and divine; such as they did not publish, were called apocryphal. ...

3038

apocryphal
[.] APOC'RYPHAL, a. Pertaining to the apecrypha; not canonical; of uncertain authority or credit; false; fictitious.

3039

apocryphally
[.] APOC'RYPHALLY, adv. Uncertainly; not indisputably.

3040

apocryphalness
[.] APOC'RYPHALNESS, n. Uncertainty, as to authenticity; doubtfulness of credit, or genuineness.

5848

beryl-crystal
[.] BER'YL-CRYSTAL, n. A species of imperfect crystal, of a very pure, clear, and equal texture. It is always of the figure of a long and slender column, irregularly hexangular, and tapering at the top. Its color is a pale brown, of a fine transparency.

13757

cry
[.] CRY, v.i. pret. and pp. cried. It ought to be cryed. [.] 1. To utter a loud voice; to speak, call or exclaim with vehemence; in a very general sense. [.] 2. To call importunately; to utter a loud voice, by way of earnest request of prayer. [.] [.] The people ...

13758

cryal
[.] CRYAL, n. The heron.

13759

cryer
[.] CRYER, n. A crier, which see. [.] CRYER, n. A kind of hawk, called the falcon gentle, an enemy to pigeous, and very swift.

13760

crying
[.] CRYING, ppr. Uttering a loud voice; proclaiming; &c. [.] CRYING, a. Notorious; common; great; as a crying sin or abuse. [.] CRYING, n. Importunate call; clamor; outcry.

13761

cryolite
[.] CRYOLITE, n. [Gr., cold, and stone, ice-stone.] A fluate of soda and alumin, found in Greenland, of a pale grayish white, snow white, or yellowish brown. It occurs in masses of a foliated structure. It has a glistening, vitreous luster.

13762

cryophorus
[.] CRYOPHORUS, n. [Gr., frost, and to bear.] Frost-bearer; an instrument for showing the relation between evaporation at low temperatures and the production of cold.

13763

crypt
[.] CRYPT, n. [Gr., to hide.] A subterranean cell or cave, especially under a church for the interment of persons; also, a subterranean chapel or oratory, and the grave of a martyr.

13764

cryptic
[.] CRYPTIC, CRYPTICAL, a. Hidden; secret; occult.

13765

cryptical
[.] CRYPTIC, CRYPTICAL, a. Hidden; secret; occult.

13766

cryptically
[.] CRYPTICALLY, adv. Secretly.

13767

cryptogam
[.] CRYPTOGAM, n. [See Cryptogamy.] In botany, a plant whose stamens and pistils are not distinctly visible.

13768

cryptogamian
[.] CRYPTOGAMIAN, a. Pertaining to plants of the class Cryptogamia, including ferns, mosses, sea-weeds, mushrooms, &c.

13769

cryptogamy
[.] CRYPTOGAMY, n. [Gr., concealed, and marriage.] Concealed marriage; a term applied to plants whose stamens and pistils are not well ascertained, or too small to be numbered with certainty.

13770

cryptographer
[.] CRYPTOGRAPHER, n. One who writes in secret characters.

13771

cryptographical
[.] CRYPTOGRAPHICAL, a. Written in secret characters or in cipher, or with sympathetic ink.

13772

cryptography
[.] CRYPTOGRAPHY, n. [Gr., hidden, and to write.] The act or art of writing in secret characters; also, secret characters or cypher.

13773

cryptology
[.] CRYPTOLOGY, n. [Gr., secret, and discourse.] Secret or enigmatical language.

13774

crystal
[.] CRYSTAL, n. [L. Gr., frost.] [.] 1. In chemistry and mineralogy, an inorganic body, which, by the operation of affinity, has assumed the form of a regular solid, terminated by a certain number of plane and smooth surfaces. [.] 2. A factitious body, cast in glass ...

13775

crystal-form
[.] CRYSTAL-FORM, a. Having the form of crystal.

13776

crystaline
[.] CRYSTALINE, a. [L., Gr.] [.] 1. Consisting of crystal; as a crystaline palace. [.] 2. Resembling crystal; pure; clear; transparent; pellucid; as a crystalline sky. [.] Crystaline heavens, in ancient astronomy, two spheres imagined between the primum mobile and ...

13777

crystalizable
[.] CRYSTALIZABLE, a. [from crystalize.] That may be crystalized; that may form or be formed into crystals.

13778

crystalization
[.] CRYSTALIZATION, n. [from crystalize.] [.] 1. The act or process by which the parts of a solid body, separated by the intervention of a fluid or by fusion, again coalesce or unite, and form a solid body. If the process is slow and undisturbed, the particles assume ...

13779

crystalize
[.] CRYSTALIZE, v.t. To cause to form crystals. [.] [.] Common salt is crystalized by the evaporation of sea water.

13780

crystalized
[.] CRYSTALIZED, pp. Formed into crystals.

13781

crystalizing
[.] CRYSTALIZING, ppr. Causing to crystalize; forming or uniting in crystals.

13782

crystallite
[.] CRYSTALLITE, n. A name given to whinstone, cooled slowly after fusion.

13783

crystalographer
[.] CRYSTALOGRAPHER, n. [infra.] One who describes crystals, or the manner of their formation.

13784

crystalographic
[.] CRYSTALOGRAPHIC, CRYSTALOGRAPHICAL, a. Pertaining to crystalography.

13785

crystalographical
[.] CRYSTALOGRAPHIC, CRYSTALOGRAPHICAL, a. Pertaining to crystalography.

13786

crystalographicall
[.] CRYSTALOGRAPHICALLY, adv. IN the manner of crystalography.

13787

crystalography
[.] CRYSTALOGRAPHY, n. [crystal, as above, and description.] [.] 1. The doctrine or science of crystalization, teaching the principles of the process, and the forms and structure of crystals. [.] 2. A discourse or treatise on crystalization.

14651

decry
[.] DECRY, v.t. [.] 1. To cry down; to censure as faulty, mean or worthless; to clamor against; to discredit by finding fault; as, to decry a poem. [.] 2. To cry down, as improper or unnecessary; to rail or clamor against; to bring into desrepute; as, to decry the ...

14916

delacrymation
[.] DELACRYMATION, n. [L. A weeping.] A preternatural discharge of watery humors from the eyes; waterishness of the eyes.

15442

descry
[.] DESCRY, v.t. [.] 1. To espy; to explore; to examine by observation. [.] [.] The house of Joseph sent to descry Bethel. Judges 1. [.] 2. To detect; to find out; to discover any thing concealed. [.] 3. To see; to behold; to have a sight of from a distance; ...

15443

descrying
[.] DESCRYING, ppr. Descovering; espying.

29121

incrystalizable
[.] INCRYS'TALIZABLE, a. [in and crystalizable.] [.] That will not crystalize; that cannot be formed into crystals.

35167

mimicry
[.] MIM'ICRY, n. Ludicrous imitation for sport or ridicule.

38586

outcry
[.] OUT'CRY, n. [.] 1. A vehement or loud cry; cry of distress. [.] 2. Clamor; noisy opposition or detestation. [.] 3. Sale at public auction.

39939

pebble-crystal
[.] PEB'BLE-CRYSTAL, n. A crystal in form of nodules, found in earthy stratums and irregular in shape.

45226

recrystalize
[.] RECRYS'TALIZE, v.i. To crystalize a second time.

47143

rock-crystal
[.] ROCK-CRYS'TAL, n. The most perfect variety of silicious earth or quartz; limpid quartz. When purest it is white or colorless, but it is found of a grayish or yellowish white, pale yellow or citron. Its most usual form is that of hexagonal prisms, surmounted by hexagonal ...

51684

sprig-crystal
[.] SPRIG-CRYSTAL, n. Crystal found in the form of a hexangular column, adhering to the stone, and terminating at the other end in a point.

57240

unapocryphal
[.] UNAPOC'RYPHAL, a. Not apocryphal; not of doubtful authority.

57804

uncrystalizable
[.] UNCRYSTALIZABLE, a. Not susceptible of crystallization.

57805

uncrystalized
[.] UNCRYS'TALIZED, a. Not crystallized.

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

134

874

100

954

165

984

Why 1828?

0
0
 


It is useful in understanding words used in the U.S. Constitution.

— Wayne (Walnut Cove, NC)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

disdiapason

DISDIAPASON, BISDIAPASON, n. [See Diapason.] In music, a compound concord in the quadruple ratio of 4:1 or 8:2.

Disdiapason diapente, a cocord in a sectuple ratio of 1:6.

Disdiapason semi-diapente, a compound concord in the proportion of 16:3.

Disdiapason ditone, a compound consontance in the proportion of 10:2.

Disdiapason semi-ditone, a compound concord in the proportion of 24:5.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

324

506

Compact Edition

304

215

CD-ROM

260

175

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.442 seconds. [1828: 21, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top