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Sunday - July 15, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comSEARCHING -word- for [ask]

Your search query [ ask ] returned 62 results.
ID Word Definition

2802

anticmask
[.] AN'TICMASK or AN'TIMASK, n. A mask of antics.

2841

antimask
[.] AN'TIMASK, n. A lesser mask.

3885

ask
[.] 'ASK, v.t. [Gr. In former times, the English word was pronounced ax, as in the royal style of assenting to bills in Parliament. "Be it as it is axed."] [.] 1. To request; to seek to obtain by words; to petition; with of before the person to whom the request is ...

3886

askance
[.] ASK'ANCE,

3887

askant
[.] ASK'ANT, adv. sideways; obliquely; towards one corner of the eye.

3888

asked
[.] 'ASKED, pp. Requested; petitioned; questioned; interrogated.

3889

askew
[.] ASKEW', adv. [.] With a wry look; aside; askant; sometimes indicating scorn, or contempt, or envy.

3890

asking
[.] 'ASKING, ppr. [.] 1. Requesting; petitioning; interrogating; inquiring. [.] 2. Silently expressing request or desire. [.] Explain the asking eye.

4271

attask
[.] ATTASK', v.t. To task; to tax. [Not used. See Task.]

5150

bask
[.] B'ASK, v.i. [The origin of this word is not obvious.] [.] To lie in warmth; to be exposed to genial heat; to be at ease and thriving under benign influences; as, to bask in the blaze of day; to bask in the sunshine of royal favor. The word includes the idea of some ...

5151

basked
[.] B'ASKED, pp. Exposed to warmth, or genial heat.

5152

basket
[.] B'ASKET, n. [.] 1. A domestic vessel made of twigs, rushes,splinters or other [.] 52 [.] flexible things interwoven. The forms and sizes of baskets are very various, as well as the uses to which they are applied; as corn-baskets, clothes-baskets, fruit-baskets, ...

5153

basket-fish
[.] B'ASKET-FISH, n. A species of sea-star, or star-fish, of the genus Asterias, and otherwise called the Magellanic star-fish. It has five rays issuing from an angular body, and dividing into innumerable branches. These when extended form a circle of three feet diameter. ...

5154

basket-hilt
[.] B'ASKET-HILT, n. [See Hilt.] A hilt which covers the hand, and defends it from injury, as of a sword.

5155

basket-hilted
[.] B'ASKET-HILTED, a. Having a hilt of basket-work.

5156

basket-salt
[.] B'ASKET-SALT, n. Salt made from salt-springs, which is purer, whiter and finer, than common brine salt.

5157

basket-woman
[.] B'ASKET-WOMAN, n. A woman who carries a basket, to and from market.

5158

basking
[.] B'ASKING, ppr. Exposing or lying exposed to the continued action of heat or genial warmth.

5159

basking-shark
[.] B'ASKING-SHARK, n. The sun-fish of the Irish; a species of squalus or shark. This fish is from three to twelve yards in length, or even longer. The upper jaw is much longer than the lower one; the tail is large and the upper part much longer than the lower; the skin ...

5721

bemask
[.] BEM'ASK, v.t. [be and mask.] To mask; to conceal.

8708

cask
[.] CASK, n. A head-piece; a helmet; a piece of defensive armor, to cover and protect the head and neck, in battle. [.] CASK, n. A close vessel for containing liquors, formed by staves, heading and hoops. This is a general term comprehending the pipe, hogshead, ...

8709

casket
... [.] CASKET, ...

14166

damask
[.] DAM'ASK, n. [.] 1. A silk stuff, having some parts raised above the ground, representing flowers and other figures; originally from Damascus. [.] 2. A kind of wrought linen, made in Flanders, in imitation of damask silks. [.] 3. Red color, from the damask-rose. [.] Damask-steel, ...

14167

damask-plum
[.] DAM'ASK-PLUM, n. A small black plum.

14168

damask-rose
[.] DAM'ASK-ROSE, n. A species of rose which is red, and another which is white. [.]

14169

damaskeened
[.] DAMASKEE'NED, pp. Carved into figures and inlaid with gold or silver wire. [.]

14170

damaskeening
[.] DAMASKEE'NING, ppr. Engraving and adorning with gold or silver wire inlaid. [.] DAMASKEE'NING, n. The act or art of beautifying iron or steel, by engraving and inlaying it with gold or silver wire. This art partakes of the mosaic, of engraving, and of carving. ...

14171

damasken
[.] DAM'ASKEN or DAM'ASKEEN, v.t. To make incisions in iron, steel, &c., and fill them with gold or silver wire, for ornament; used chiefly for adorning swordblades, guards, locks of pistols, &c.

14172

damaskin
[.] DAM'ASKIN, n. A saber, so called from the manufacture of Damascus.

16751

dismask
[.] DISMASK, v.t. [dis and mask.] To strip off a mask; to uncover; to remove that which conceals.

16752

dismasked
[.] DISMASKED, pp. Divested of a mask; stripped of covering or disguise; uncovered.

16753

dismasking
[.] DISMASKING, ppr. Stripping of a mask or covering.

22291

flask
[.] FL'ASK, n. [.] 1. A kind of bottle; as a flask of wine or oil. [.] 2. A vessel for powder. [.] 3. A bed in a gun-carriage.

22292

flasket
[.] FL'ASKET, n. [.] 1. A vessel in which viands are served up. [.] 2. A long shallow basket.

23899

galligaskins
[.] GALLIGAS'KINS, n. Large open hose; used only in ludicrous language.

24053

gasket
[.] GAS'KET, n. A plaited cord fastened to the sail-yard of a ship,and used to furl or tie the sail to the yard.

24054

gaskins
[.] GAS'KINS, n. plu. Galligaskins; wide open hose. [See Galligaskins.]

25782

handbasket
[.] HAND'BASKET, n. A small or portable basket.

26002

hask
[.] HASK, n. A case made of rushes or flags. [Not used.]

28135

immask
[.] IMM`ASK, v.t. [in and mask.] To cover, as with a mask; to disguise.

28136

immasked
[.] IMM`ASKED, pp. Covered; masked.

28137

immasking
[.] IMM`ASKING, ppr. Covering; disguising.

28790

incask
[.] INC`ASK, v.t. To put into a cask.

34346

mask
[.] M`ASK, n. [.] 1. A cover for the face; that which conceals the face, especially a cover with apertures for the eyes and mouth; a visor. A mask is designed to conceal the face from beholders, or to preserve the complexion from injury by exposure to the weather and ...

34347

mask-house
[.] M`ASK-HOUSE, n. A place for masquerades.

34348

masked
[.] M`ASKED, pp. Having the face covered; concealed; disguised. [.] 1. a. In botany, personate.

34349

masker
[.] M`ASKER, n. One that wears a mask; one that plays the fool at a masquerade.

34350

maskery
[.] M`ASKERY, n. The dress or disguise of a masker.

34351

masking
[.] M`ASKING, ppr. Covering with a mask; concealing.

38989

overtask
[.] OVERT'ASK, v.t. To impose too heavy a task or injunction on.

42137

powder-flask
[.] POW'DER-FLASK, n. A flask in which gunpowder is carried.

48608

scuttle-cask
[.] SCUT'TLE-CASK, upon deck.

49336

seraskier
[.] SERAS'KIER, n. A Turkish commander or general of land forces.

54489

task
[.] T`ASK, n. [.] 1. Business imposed by another, often a definite quantity or amount of labor. Each man has his task. When he has performed his task, his time is his own. Ex.5. [.] 2. Business; employment. [.] [.] His mental powers were equal to greater tasks. [.] 3. ...

54490

tasked
[.] T`ASKED, pp. Required to perform something.

54491

tasker
[.] T`ASKER, n. One that imposes a task.

54492

tasking
[.] T`ASKING, ppr. Imposing a task on; requiring to perform.

54493

taskmaster
[.] T`ASKMASTER, n. [task and master.] One who imposes a task, or burdens with labor. Sinful propensities and appetites are men's most unrelenting taskmasters. They condemn us to unceasing drudgery, and reward us with pain, remorse and poverty. Next to our sinful propensities, ...

57280

unasked
[.] UN'ASKED, a. [.] 1. Not asked; unsolicited; as, to bestow favors unasked; that was an unasked favor. [.] 2. Not sought by entreaty or care. [.] The bearded corn ensu'd from earth unask'd.

58887

unmask
[.] UNM'ASK, v.t. To strip of a mask or of any disguise; to lay open what is concealed. [.] UNM'ASK, v.i. To put off a mask.

58888

unmasked
[.] UNM'ASKED, pp. [.] 1. Stripped of a mask or disguise. [.] 2. a. Open; exposed to view.

62277

wine-cask
[.] WINE-CASK, n. [wine and cask.] A cask in which wine is or has been kept.

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I love the biblical and christian definition and references

— Tresvan (Clayton, NC)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

licorice

LIC'ORICE, n. [L. glycyrrhiza; Gr. sweet, and root.]

A plant of the genus Glycyrrhiza. The root of this plant abounds with a sweet balsamic juice, much used in pectoral compositions.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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