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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comSEARCHING -word- for [Temper]

Your search query [ Temper ] returned 40 results.
ID Word Definition

4273

attemper
[.] ATTEM'PER, v.t. [L. attempero, of ad and tempero, to temper, mix, or moderate. See Temper.] [.] 1. To reduce, modify or moderate by mixture; as, to attemper heat by a cooling mixture, or spirit by diluting it with water. [.] 2. To soften, mollify or moderate; ...

4274

attemperance
[.] ATTEM'PERANCE, n. Temperance. [Not used.]

4275

attemperate
[.] ATTEM'PERATE, a. [L. attemperatus.] [.] Tempered; proportioned; suited. [.] Hope must be proportioned and attemperate to the promise. [.] ATTEM'PERATE, v.t. To attemper. [Not in use.]

4276

attempered
[.] ATTEM'PERED, ppr. Reduced in quality; moderated; softened; well mixed; suited.

4277

attempering
[.] ATTEM'PERING, ppr. Moderating in quality; softening; mixing in due proportion; making suitable.

4278

attemperly
[.] ATTEM'PERLY, adv. In a temperate manner. [Not in use.]

5931

best-tempered
[.] BEST-TEM'PERED, a. Having the most kind or mild temper.

12289

contemper
[.] CONTEMPER, v.t. [L., to mix or temper. See Temper.] To moderate; to reduce to a lower degree by mixture with opposite or different qualities; to temper. [.] [.] The leaves qualify and contemper the heat.

12290

contemperament
[.] CONTEMPERAMENT, n. Moderated or qualified degree; a degree of any quality reduced to that of another; temperament.

12291

contemperate
[.] CONTEMPERATE, v.t. [See Contemper.] To temper; to reduce the quality of, by mixing something opposite or different; to moderate.

12292

contemperation
[.] CONTEMPERATION, n. [.] 1. The act of reducing a quality by admixture of the contrary; the act of moderating or tempering. [.] 2. Temperament; proportionate mixture; as the contemperament of humors in different bodies. [.] [Instead of these words, temper and temperament ...

17125

distemper
[.] DISTEMPER, n. [dis and temper.] [.] 1. Literally, an undue or unnatural temper, or disproportionate mixture of parts. Hence, [.] 2. Disease; malady; indisposition; any morbid state of an animal body, or of any part of it; a state in which the animal economy is ...

17126

distemperance
[.] DISTEMPERANCE, n. Distemperature.

17127

distemperate
[.] DISTEMPERATE, a. Immoderate. [Little used.]

17128

distemperature
[.] DISTEMPERATURE, n. [.] 1. Bad temperature; intemperateness; excess of heat or cold, or of other qualities; a noxious state; as the distemperature of the air of climate. [.] 2. Violent tumultuousness; outrageousness. [.] 3. Perturbation of mind. [.] 4. Confusion; ...

17129

distempered
[.] DISTEMPERED, pp. or a. [.] 1. Diseased in body, or disordered in mind. We speak of a distempered body, a distempered limb, a distempered head or brain. [.] 2. Disturbed; ruffled; as distempered passions. [.] 3. Deprived of temper or moderation; immoderate; as ...

17130

distempering
[.] DISTEMPERING, ppr. Affecting with disease or disorder; disturbing; depriving of moderation.

30339

intemperament
[.] INTEM'PERAMENT, n. [in and temperament.] [.] A bad state or constitution; as the intemperament of an ulcerated part.

30340

intemperance
[.] INTEM'PERANCE, n. [L. intemperantia.] [.] 1. In a general sense, want of moderation or due restraint; excess in any kind of action or indulgence; any exertion of body or mind, or any indulgence of appetites or passions which is injurious to the person or contrary ...

30341

intemperate
[.] INTEM'PERATE, a. [L. intemperatus; in and temperatus, from tempero, to moderate or restrain.] [.] 1. Not moderate or restrained within due limits; indulging to excess any appetite or passion, either habitually or in a particular instance; immoderate in enjoyment ...

30342

intemperately
[.] INTEM'PERATELY, adv. With excessive indulgence of appetite or passion; with undue exertion; immoderately; excessively.

30343

intemperateness
[.] INTEM'PERATENESS, n. Want of moderation; excessive degree of indulgence; as the intemperateness of appetite or passion. [.] 1. Immoderate degree of any quality in the weather, as in cold, heat or storms.

30344

intemperature
[.] INTEM'PERATURE, n. Excess of some quality.

35618

mistemper
[.] MISTEM'PER, v.t. To temper ill; to disorder.

35619

mistempered
[.] MISTEM'PERED, pp. Tempered ill.

54656

temper
[.] TEM'PER, v.t. [L. tempero, to mix or moderate] [.] 1. To mix so that one part qualifies the other; to bring to a moderate state; as, to temper justice with mercy. [.] 2. To compound; to form by mixture; to qualify, as by an ingredient; or in general, to mix, unite ...

54657

temperament
[.] TEM'PERAMENT, n. [L. temperamentum.] [.] 1. Constitution; state with respect to the predominance of any quality; as the temperament of the body. [.] [.] Bodies are denominated hot and cold, in proportion to the present temperament of that part of our body to which ...

54658

temperamental
[.] TEMPERAMENT'AL, a. Constitutional. [Not much used.]

54659

temperance
[.] TEM'PERANCE, n. [L. temperantia, from tempero.] [.] 1. Moderation; particularly, habitual moderation in regard to the indulgence of the natural appetites and passions; restrained or moderate indulgence; as temperance in eating and drinking; temperance in the indulgence ...

54660

temperate
[.] TEM'PERATE, a. [L. temperatus.] Moderate; not excessive; as temperate heat; a temperate climate; temperate air. [.] 1. Moderate in the indulgence of the appetites and passions; as temperate in eating and drinking; temperate in pleasures; temperate in speech. [.] [.] ...

54661

temperately
[.] TEM'PERATELY, adv. Moderately; without excess or extravagance. [.] 1. Calmly; without violence of passion; as, to reprove one temperately. [.] 2. With moderate force. [.] [.] Winds that temperately blow.

54662

temperateness
[.] TEM'PERATENESS, n. Moderation; freedom from excess; as the temperateness of the weather or of a climate. [.] 1. Calmness; coolness of mind.

54663

temperative
[.] TEM'PERATIVE, a. Having the power or quality of tempering.

54664

temperature
[.] TEM'PERATURE, n. [L. temperature.] [.] 1. In physics, the state of a body with regard to heat or cold, as indicated by the thermometer; or the degree of free caloric which a body possesses,when compared with other bodies. When a body applied to another, either excites ...

54665

tempered
[.] TEM'PERED, pp. Duly mixed or modified; reduced to a proper state; softened; allayed; hardened. [.] 1. Adjusted by musical temperament. [.] 2. a. Disposed; as a well tempered, good tempered, or bad tempered man.

54666

tempering
[.] TEM'PERING, ppr. Mixing and qualifying; qualifying by mixture; softening; mollifying; reducing to a state of moderation; hardening.

57307

unattempered
[.] UNATTEM'PERED, a. Not tempered by mixture.

58111

undistempered
[.] UNDISTEM'PERED, a. [.] 1. Not diseased; free from malady. [.] 2. Free from perturbation.

59817

untemperate
[.] UNTEM'PERATE, a. Intemperate. [The latter is now used.]

59818

untempered
[.] UNTEM'PERED, a. Not tempered; not duly mixed for use; not durable or strong.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

sea-cow

SE'A-COW, n. [sea and cow.] The Trichecus manatus, or manati. [See Manati.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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