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Saturday - September 24, 2016

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comSEARCHING -word- for [CREDIT]

Your search query [ CREDIT ] returned 22 results.
ID Word Definition

455

accredit
[.] ACCRED'IT, v.t. [L. ad and credo, to believe, or give faith to. See Credit.] [.] To give credit, authority, or reputation; to accredit an envoy, is to receive him in his public character, and give him credit and rank accordingly.

456

accreditation
[.] ACCREDITA'TION, n. That which gives title to credit. [Little used.]

457

accredited
[.] ACCRED'ITED, pp. Allowed; received with reputation; authorized in a public character.

458

accrediting
[.] ACCRED'ITING, ppr. Giving authority or reputation.

11664

concredit
[.] CONCREDIT, v.t. To entrust. [Not used.]

13433

credit
[.] CREDIT, n. [L., See Creed.] [.] 1. Belief; faith; a reliance or resting of the mind on the truth of something said or done. We give credit to a mans declaration, when the mind rests on the truth of it, without doubt or suspicion, which is attended with wavering. We ...

13434

creditable
[.] CREDITABLE, a. Reputable; that may be enjoyed or exercised with reputation or esteem; estimable. A man pursues a creditable occupation, or way of living.

13435

creditableness
[.] CREDITABLENESS, n. Reputation; estimation.

13436

creditably
[.] CREDITABLY, adv. Reputable; with credit; without disgrace.

13437

credited
[.] CREDITED, pp. Believed; trusted; passed to the credit, or entered on the credit side of an account.

13438

crediting
[.] CREDITING, ppr. Believing; trusting; entering to the credit in account.

13439

creditor
[.] CREDITOR, n. [L. See Creed.] [.] 1. A person to whom a sum of money or other thing is due, by obligation, promise or in law; properly, one who gives credit in commerce; but in a general sense, one who has a just claim for money; correlative to debtor. In a figurative ...

13440

creditrix
[.] CREDITRIX, n. A female creditor.

16460

discredit
[.] DISCREDIT, n. [See the Verb.] [.] 1. Want of credit or good reputation; some degree of disgrace or reproach; disesteem; applied to persons or things. Frauds in manufactures bring them into discredit. [.] [.] It is the duty of every Christian to be concerned for ...

16461

discreditable
[.] DISCREDITABLE, a. Tending to injure credit; injurious to reputation; disgraceful; disreputable.

16462

discredited
[.] DISCREDITED, pp. Disbelieved; brought into disrepute; disgraced.

16463

discrediting
[.] DISCREDITING, ppr. Disbelieving; not trusting to; depriving of credit; disgracing.

39383

paper-credit
[.] PAPER-CRED'IT, n. Evidences of debt; promissory notes, &c. passing current in commercial transactions. [.] 1. Notes or bills emitted by public authority, promising the payment of money. The revolution in N. America was carried on by means of paper-credit.

57137

unaccredited
[.] UNACCRED'ITED, a. Not accredited; not received; not authorized. The minister or the consul remained unaccredited.

57794

uncreditable
[.] UNCRED'ITABLE, a. [.] 1. Not in good credit or reputation; not reputable. [.] 2. Not for the credit or reputation.

57795

uncreditableness
[.] UNCRED'ITABLENESS, n. [.] 1. Want of reputation. [.] 2. The quality of being disreputable.

57796

uncredited
[.] UNCRED'ITED, a. Not believed.

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Word of the Day

call

CALL, v.t. [Heb. To hold or restrain.] In a general sense, to drive; to strain or force out sound. Hence,

1. To name; to denominate or give a name. And God called the light day, and the darkness he called night. Gen. 1.

2. To convoke; to summon; to direct or order to meet; to assemble by order or public notice; often with together; as, the king called his council together; the president called together the congress.

3. To request to meet or come.

He sent his servants to call them that were bidden. Math. 22.

4. To invite.

Because I have called and ye refused. Prov. 1.

5. To invite or summon to come or be present; to invite, or collect.

Call all your senses to you.

6. To give notice to come by authority; to command to come; as, call a servant.

7. To proclaim; to name, or publish the name.

Nor parish clerk, who calls the psalm so clear.

8. To appoint or designate, as for an office, duty or employment.

See, I have called by name Bezaleel. Ex. 31.

Paul called to be an apostle. Rom. 1.

9. To invite; to warn; to exhort. Is. 22:12.

10. To invite or draw into union with Christ; to bring to know, believe and obey the gospel.
Rev. 8:28

11. To own and acknowledge. Heb. 2:11.

12. To invoke or appeal to.

I call God for a record. 2 Cor. 1.

13. To esteem or account. Is. 47:5. Mat. 3:15.

To call down, to invite, or to bring down.

To call back, to revoke, or retract; to recall; to summon or bring back.

To call for, to demand, require or claim, as a crime calls for punishment; or to cause to grow. Ezek. 36. Also, to speak for; to ask; to request; as, to call for a dinner.

To call in, to collect, as to call in debts or money; or to draw from circulation, as to call in clipped coin; or to summon together; to invite to come together; as, to call in neighbors or friends.

To call forth, to bring or summon to action; as, to call forth all the faculties of the mind.

To call off, to summon away; to divert; as, to call off the attention; to call off workmen from their employment.

To call up, to bring into view or recollection; as, to call u the image of a deceased friend; also, to bring into action, or discussion; as, to call up a bill before a legislative body.

To call over, to read a list, name by name; to recite separate particulars in order, as a roll of names.

To call out, to summon to fight; to challenge; also, to summon into service; as, to call out the militia.

To call to mind, to recollect; to revive in memory.

CALL, v.i.

1. To utter a loud sound, or to address by name; to utter the name; sometimes with to.

The angel of God called to Hagar. Gen. 21.

2. To stop, without intention of staying; to make a short stop; as, to call at the inn. This use Johnson supposes to have originated in the custom of denoting ones presence at the door by a call. It is common, in this phrase, to use at, as to call at the inn; or on, as to call on a friend. This application seems to be equivalent to speak, D. Kallen. Let us speak at this place.

To call on, to make a short visit to; also, to solicit payment, or make a demand of a debt. In a theological sense, to pray to or worship; as, to call on the name of the Lord. Gen. 4. To repeat solemnly.

To call out, to utter a loud voice; to bawl; a popular use of the phrase.

CALL, n.

1. A vocal address, of summons or invitation; as, he will not come at a call.

2. Demand; requisition; public claim; as, listen to the calls of justice or humanity.

3. Divine vocation, or summons; as the call of Abraham.

4. Invitation; request of a public body or society; as, a clergyman has a call to settle in the ministry.

5. A summons from heaven; impulse.

St. Paul believed he had a call, when he persecuted the Christians.

6. Authority; command.

7. A short visit; as, to make a call; to give one a call that is, a speaking to; D. Kallen. To give one a call, is to stop a moment and speak or say a word; or to have a short conversation with.

8. Vocation; employment. In this sense calling is generally used.

9. A naming; a nomination.

10. Among hunters, a lesson blown on the horn, to comfort the hounds.

11. Among seamen, a whistle or pipe, used by the boatswain and his mate, to summon the sailors to their duty.

12. The English name of the mineral called by the Germans tungsten or wolfram.

13. Among fowlers, the noise or cry of a fowl, or a pipe to call birds by imitating their voice.

14. In legislative bodies, the call of the house, is a calling over the names of the members, to discover who is absent or for other purpose; a calling of names with a view to obtain answers from the person named.

Random Word

hyemal

HYE'MAL, a. [L. hiems, winter.] Belonging to winter; done in winter.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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